HEALTH

Study investigates dietary exposures in relation to coronary heart disease

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO Although a wealth of literature links dietary factors and coronary heart disease, the strength of the evidence supporting valid associations has not been evaluated systematically in a single investigation.

A new study published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine seeks to change that.

Researchers conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE for prospective cohort studies or randomized trials investigating dietary exposures in relation to CHD. Strong evidence supports valid associations of protective factors, including intake of vegetables and nuts. There are also several associations of harmful factors, including intake of trans–fatty acids and foods with a high glycemic index or load.

There was also strong evidence in support of monounsaturated fatty acids and “prudent” and “western” dietary patterns as beneficiary to heart health. Moderate evidence of associations exists for intake of fish, omega-3 fatty acids, folate, whole grains, dietary vitamins E and C, beta carotene, alcohol, fruit and fiber.

The evidence supports a valid association of a limited number of dietary factors and dietary patterns with CHD, the researchers concluded. Future evaluation of dietary patterns, including their nutrient and food components, in cohort studies and randomized trials is recommended.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Nick Jonas, Bayer Diabetes Care launch contest to encourage kids with diabetes

BY Allison Cerra

TARRYTOWN, N.Y. Bayer Diabetes Care and music sensation Nick Jonas of the Jonas Brothers are inviting kids and teens with diabetes to enter the Bayer “Express Your Simple Win Creativity Contest” online for a chance to meet the singer in person.

Since the announcement of their partnership last summer, Bayer Diabetes Care and Jonas, who has Type 1 diabetes and uses the Bayer Contour meter, have taken steps to inspire young people with diabetes to achieve Simple Wins: small, everyday victories for managing diabetes that can lead to big differences over time.

Nick’s Simple Wins are writing lyrics, performing and making music. One example of how he was able to creatively express this was through his song about living with diabetes, “A Little Bit Longer.” Now he wants to encourage other young people with diabetes to share their creativity and their own personal Simple Wins through the Bayer “Express Your Simple Win Creativity Contest.”

“With this contest, I hope people are inspired by others’ entries, as well as encouraged to submit and share their own, but most of all, I hope that everyone has fun with it,” Jonas said. “Diabetes can be hard to live with, but when you manage it well, you can still do the things you love most in the world.”

To enter the Bayer “Express Your Simple Win Creativity Contest,” young people with diabetes between the ages of 6 and 18 are asked to record a 15-30 second video that demonstrates their Simple Win in an artistic way. The personal video submission can be a visual demonstration of original song lyrics, photography, painting/drawing, acting or another form of creativity. Once the video is complete, entrants can go to www.NicksSimpleWins.com and upload and complete the eligibility criteria to enter the contest.

During the last week of each month from April through September, the top three videos will be posted on www.NicksSimpleWins.com and the public will vote on the best one, which will be announced at the end of the month. Each monthly winner will win a prize and be eligible for the Grand Prize drawing. In October, following the end of the contest, the top three favorite videos will be picked by a team of judges and those entrants will get to meet Nick in person.

Each of the Grand Prize winners and a guest of the Bayer “Express Your Simple Win Creativity Contest” will meet Nick Jonas in person at a future date and place. All monthly winners will be required to provide a letter from a physician confirming winner’s diagnosis of diabetes.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Fat-rich diet may reduce epileptic seizures, according to study

BY Alaric DeArment

MILWAUKEE Most parents would not let their children eat a lot of whipping cream, vegetable oil and butter, but a new study shows that diet rich in those might benefit children with epilepsy.

The study, conducted by researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin and appearing in the November issue of the journal Epileptica, indicates that a ketogenic diet might limit seizures.

According to a recent study of 43 patients at the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin that has yet to be published, the approach has been effective. But, the researchers cautioned, the diet would require close supervision by healthcare professionals.

“This diet cannot be tried by parents without close medical management and follow-up,” lead study author and MWC professor of pediatrics Mary Zupanc said.

Of the children who started on the ketogenic diet between 2002 and 2006, half had a reduction in seizure frequency by more than 90% and had improved brain functioning. Most of the children who responded to the diet had either the most common form of epilepsy or a severe form called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?