HEALTH

Pharmavite announces partnership with AAFP

BY Michael Johnsen

LEAWOOD, Kan. Pharmavite has aligned with the American Academy of Family Physicians’ Consumer Alliance Program, the company announced Friday. As part of the partnership, Pharmavite will underwrite the development of nonbranded, physician-reviewed consumer education content on vitamins, supplements, general health and heart health, which will be featured on AAFP’s consumer health site FamilyDoctor.org.

Serving as an online destination for patients seeking information on health questions, issues and concerns, FamilyDoctor.org recently was named one of “Five Great Health Sites” on a Newsweek.com blog, and one of the “‘Top Ten’ Most Useful Web Sites” by the Medical Library Association. FamilyDoctor.org welcomes, on average, 3.5 million unique visitors each month.

“The Consumer Alliance Program helps fulfill the AAFP’s objective of improving the health of the public, in that it allows new opportunities for excellent patient education through FamilyDoctor.org,” stated AAFP EVP and CEO Douglas Henley.

While FamilyDoctor.org and the AAFP do not endorse any specific brand, product or service, the Consumer Alliance Program is an opportunity for Familydoctor.org and AAFP to collaborate with consumer products companies that share the common goal of informing consumers, as well as medical professionals, about new advances in product science, nutrition and best practices for good health and a balanced lifestyle.

“Generally the best way to ensure you get the vitamins and minerals your body needs is through a balanced and varied diet, but that is not always possible,” Henley said.

Americans increasingly are using vitamins and dietary supplements to prevent nutritional deficiencies. Nielsen’s Scantrack point-of-sale data indicates that use of vitamins, minerals and supplements by U.S. consumers increased 31% from 2005 to 2009.

With increased use of these products comes an increased need for patient education to ensure their proper usage. As part of their counseling, physicians can now refer their patients to the educational materials on FamilyDoctor.org about the appropriate use of vitamins and supplements.

“We know that many of our patients already use vitamins and supplements,” Henley said. “As family physicians, it is important that we counsel our patients on how to use these products properly, what vitamins and minerals they might not be getting enough of in their diet, and recommend appropriate dosages to resolve those deficiencies if they exist. It is also important to remind them that taking supplements does not replace the need to eat a healthy diet.”

The AAFP maintains complete editorial control over the content developed for FamilyDoctor.org to ensure creation of balanced, evidence-based content that can help consumers make informed decisions. The content is reviewed extensively by family physician editors, members of the AAFP Commission on Health of the Public and Science and credentialed expert consultants.

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New study addresses link between gum disease treatment, diabetes

BY Allison Cerra

OTTAWA A new study to be published in the latest issue of The Cochrane Library found that treating periodontal (gum) disease in diabetics may lower their insulin levels.

A group of researchers from University of Edinburgh and supported by colleagues at the Peninsula Dental School, the University of Ottawa and UCL Eastman Dental Institute suggested that Type 2 diabetics may benefit from such treatments, after analyzing 690 papers of randomized controlled trials of people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes who had also been diagnosed with periodontal disease and included seven studies in the review that fulfilled prespecified criteria.

Most healthcare professionals, the team said, do not address the correlation between periodontal disease and insulin levels. It is believed that when bacteria infect the mouth and cause inflammation, the resulting chemical changes reduce the effectiveness of insulin produced in the body, thus making it more difficult for diabetics to control their blood sugar

Terry Simpson, lead author at the Edinburgh Dental Institute, said: “It would be wise to advise patients of the relationship between treating periodontal disease and the possibility of lowering their blood sugar levels. Additionally, an oral health assessment should be recommended as part of their routine diabetes management.”

In December, a study published in the Journal of Public Health Dentistry reported that 90% of patients with periodontal disease were at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

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Inaugural FMI Supermarket Health and Wellness puts all the pieces and players together for first time

BY Rob Eder

LAS VEGAS For the more than 260 supermarket executives and suppliers that gathered here this week at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center, the first edition of the Food Marketing Institute’s Supermarket Health and Wellness conference was an important opportunity to examine strategies for promoting health and wellness to supermarket shoppers utilizing the entire store and every department in it.

The new event, which grew out of FMI’s old Supermarket Pharmacy Conference, co-located with FMI 2010, and sought to bring together the companies and the teams within those organizations that “have responsibility for the many aspects of health and wellness delivered to customers,” FMI VP pharmacy services and health and wellness, Cathy Polley told Drug Store News.

“Attendees joined us from pharmacy, nutrition services, fresh foods, human resources, consumer affairs and human strategies. This type of attendance shows that all parts of the store are needed to develop and deliver an integrated approach to creating comprehensive health and wellness programs for customers. We were pleased to welcome back the many pharmacy partners we’ve worked with over the years while engaging with a broader group involved in making health and wellness a reality in the supermarket,” Polley said.

Sharon Glass, group VP health and wellness for Catalina Marketing, gave attendees a look at how retailers and vendors can partner to empower customers to make healthier purchasing decisions. According to ongoing shopper research compiled by Catalina, while most consumers believe that their supermarket carries the products they need to eat healthy, only 36% believed that the store helps the to manage and/or reduce health risks and concerns.

With roughly 40% of households with children reporting that they regularly feed their kids fast food, the implications for the nation’s health are extremely dire — this is first generation of children whose life expectancy is shorter than their parents, Glass noted. At the heart of many shoppers’ poor shopping decisions is a lack of information about the healthy foods and products that are available to them. For retailers and vendors the first step is about chipping away at the myths that drive poor eating habits.

For instance, 64% of shoppers Catalina interviewed believe that low-calorie foods are too expensive, only 51% believe that there is a low-calorie option available to them, and 40% simply believe that low-calorie foods don’t taste good. However, generally speaking, consumers seem to believe that making small changes in their lifestyle and diet can make a big impact on their overall health.

These findings gave birth to a program called Simple Substitutes, a pilot Catalina spearheaded with a key group of retailers and a small group of non-competing brands, including, Special K, V8 Fusion Light and Land O’Lakes Light. Through the program, shoppers that purchased certain types of items were selected at the register to receive coupons, recipes and other types of informational messaging that tied into new, lower calorie offerings from one of the brands. The back of receipts included the message to the customer, “Try this Simple Solution Today,” with a tip for a recipe utilizing one of the new lower calorie product, a coupon to try the product or some other offer.

The results of the pilot indicate that this type of messaging can produce lasting changes in consumers that can play a huge role in the success rate of new, better-for-you food products. Trial rates ran significantly higher among consumers that received the offers, and anywhere from 62% to 76% of shoppers that tried one of the new items involved in the program intended to repurchase the product.

In back-to-back sessions from Hy-Vee VP human resources Sheila Laing and AVP health and wellness Helen Eddy, talked about how Hy-Vee had worked to create the organizational structure to promote health and wellness — not just to customers, but to its own employees, too — as well as how to leverage the healthcare professionals that already exist within the company to drive those programs.

Building from Hy-Vee’s corporate mission to “make lives easier, healthier and happier,” Laing talked about the company-wide commitment that is shaping and driving such programs as Live Healthy Hy-Vee, an offshoot of the national Live Healthy America program that challenges consumers, communities and organization to compete against other groups to meet certain health and fitness goals.

Hy-Vee offers the program to all of its employees 19 years and older, and it is making a major impact, not only on the lives of Hy-Vee associates, but also on total healthcare costs — both for the employee and for the company. For every $1 Hy-Vee has invested in the program, participants have lost about a pound. In five years, the 21,000 employees who participated in the program have lost more than 163,000 pounds. And in that time only 12% of the total population of participants had repeated the program in any two years during that five-year period, suggesting that the changes and weight loss has been lasting.

In another program Hy-Vee calls Healthy Lifestyles, which is a component of the company’s medical plan, Hy-Vee incentivizes its employees to meet certain health and wellness goals, such as quitting smoking, by lowering the cost of coverage for participants. For example, Laing explained, an associate who uses tobacco and enrolls in the program receives a $5 off his or her weekly insurance costs.

In addition, as Hy-Vee identified savings in its health plan, as the average claims cost per associate began to fall, the company opted to share that savings with its employees. Twice a year, including the week before Christmas, Hy-Vee waives the weekly cost of coverage, effectively putting money back into the pockets of its employees.

Importantly, Hy-Vee, as much as possible, is using its own people — it pharmacists and dietitians, primarily — to drive its Healthy Lifestyles program, including delivering smoking cessation programs, as well as diabetes management, health screenings and more advanced health coaching. For example, at $150 a person, the cost to deliver a smoking cessation program is the same whether Hy-Vee uses its own healthcare professionals to deliver the program, or if Hy-Vee hires someone else to do it. The difference is, Laing explained, “instead of paying it out, we are paying ourselves to do it.”

The next step has led Hy-Vee to begin selling these types of services to companies and community organizations, at significant savings. In the case of biometric testing, Hy-Vee is able to sell health-screening services for $40 a test — about half of what a company would typically pay to have their beneficiaries receive such a service. The net effect is that, in addition to driving down its own healthcare costs, Hy-Vee’s Healthy Lifestyles program is emerging as a new profit center for the company.

Fittingly, the inaugural event was kicked off with a keynote address delivered by White House chef Sam Kass.

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