HEALTH

Lack of fiber in Americans’ diet caused by negative perception, Mintel finds

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO Recent Mintel research released Thursday found that fiber is noticeably absent from the typical American’s diet. One-in-3 respondents to a recent survey considered their diet to be healthy, but only 1-in-5 reported actively looking for and buying products with added health claims. Based on these results, only a minority of adults are likely to be interested in fiber-enhanced products with digestive claims.

While 30% of consumers say they make it a point to eat naturally fiber-rich foods, studies show most Americans are failing to meet their recommended daily fiber intake. This may be explained by the 27% of respondents who think food with added fiber usually has an unpleasant taste.

“Many people have negative perceptions about the taste of fiber,” stated Molly Heyl-Rushmer, senior health-and-wellness analyst at Mintel. “The taste deters them from eating a fiber-added product that has numerous health benefits.”

As many as 25% of respondents think fiber only is necessary for those who suffer from irregularity or other digestive problems, with men being more likely than women to hold this belief. And 30% of men (compared with 23% of women) also believe supplements are just as effective as fiber-enriched foods.

Despite the fact that research shows that a lack of fiber is linked to various cancers, heart disease and diabetes, 22% of consumers don’t know enough about fiber to know if it is important to their health. Furthermore, 37% believe they can get enough fiber from regular foods, so supplements and food with added fiber are unnecessary.

“Consumers are more likely to report limiting sugar, fat, sodium, and calorie intake than they are to eat naturally fiber-rich foods,” Heyl-Rushmer noted. “Adults don’t fully understand the link between fiber and health.”

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Axellia acquires OTC maker

BY Michael Johnsen

COPENHAGEN Axellia Pharmaceuticals on Tuesday announced its acquisition of the Phoenix Global Supply Group, based in White Plains, N.Y., to supply over-the-counter topical anti-infectives to the U.S. and Canadian markets.

“An important part of our strategy is to expand our offering to include finished products in targeted dosage forms and geographic markets,” said Axellia CEO Carl-Ake Carlsson, “while continuing to develop our core active pharmaceutical ingredients business.”

Phoenix’s initial product launches in North America are expected to include private-label offerings around bacitracin and polymyxin B sulfate, two of the major ingredients found in topical anti-infective first aid products.

“The Phoenix team is delighted to welcome Axellia as its majority owner. While there are many other manufacturers of over-the-counter antibiotic products, we believe that the U.S. and Canadian markets for these products continue to be attractive and provide a significant opportunity for Phoenix,” stated Walter Jenkins, Phoenix CEO.

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NAD recommends InflameAway Celadrin ad claims be discontinued

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK The National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus on Wednesday recommended that Imagenetix discontinue certain advertising claims made for the dietary supplement InflameAway Celadrin following a challenge by Schiff Nutrition Group. InflameAway executives countered that they did not agree with the decision, but agreed to abide by NAD’s suggestions.

Imagenetix, at the outset of the NAD review, informed the bureau that the company had been revising its marketing campaign prior to the NAD challenge and had discontinued all of its comparative claims versus glucosamine/chondroitin (and other joint health products), as well as its claim that Celadrin has been “proven to work.”

NAD advised Imagenetix to also discontinue the claim that Celadrin is “clinically tested and shown to be effective for improving joint comfort” as the evidence in the record was inconsistent and insufficient to support a claim that either Celadrin, or its active ingredient, cetylated fatty acid, had been proven effective through clinical trial.

Further, NAD noted, while the patent on the ingredient is evidence of its novelty, the patent alone cannot support a “clinically shown” claim. NAD recommended that the advertiser discontinue the claim.

NAD also found that the claim that “patented InflameAway Celadrin is a medical breakthrough,” was not supported by the research on Celadrin or by the patent on the key ingredient in Celadrin and recommended that it be discontinued.

InflameAway, in its advertiser’s statement, said it is “extremely disappointed that the unrebutted opinions of two highly qualified scientific experts have been rejected in favor of the non-scientific judgment made by NAD counsel.”

However, in the spirit of cooperation, the company said it “has and will continue to voluntarily discontinue the use of all NAD challenged claims in its national advertising.”

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