HEALTH

J&J recalls lots of Infants’ Mylicon Gas Relief Dye Free

BY Michael Johnsen

FORT WASHINGTON, Pa. Johnson & Johnson-Merck Consumer Pharmaceuticals Company Monday evening voluntarily recalled approximately 12,000 units of Infants’ Mylicon Gas Relief Dye Free (simethicone-antigas) non-staining sold in 1-ounce plastic bottles that were distributed after Oct. 5 because some of the bottles could include metal fragments that were generated during the manufacturing process.

Although the potential for serious medical events is low, the company is implementing this recall to the consumer level as a precaution. If any medical events were to occur, most are expected to be temporary and resolve without medical treatment. Parents who have given the product to their infant and are concerned should contact their health care provider immediately.

The company is taking this action in consultation with the Food and Drug Administration, J&J reported.

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NIH funded study in search of hearing loss supplement

BY Michael Johnsen

ANN ARBOR, Mich. The University of Michigan Kresge Hearing Research Institute on Monday announced they will be testing the use of vitamins and magnesium in the prevention of hearing loss caused by loud noises.

“When we can’t prevent noise-induced hearing loss through screening programs and use of hearing protection, then we really need to come up with some way of protecting people who are still going to have noise exposure,” said Glenn Green, assistant professor of otolaryngology at the U-M Health System and director of the U-M Children’s Hearing Laboratory.

The combination of vitamins A, C and E, plus magnesium, will be given in pill form to patients who are participating in the research. Developed at the U-M Kresge Hearing Research Institute, the combination, called AuraQuell, is designed to be taken before a person is exposed to loud noises. In earlier testing at U-M on guinea pigs, the combination of the four micronutrients blocked about 80 percent of the noise-induced hearing impairment.

Now, AuraQuell is being tested in a set of four multinational human clinical trials: military trials in Sweden and Spain, an industrial trial in Spain, and a trial involving students at the University of Florida who listen to music at high volumes on their iPods and other PDAs, funded by the National Institutes of Health. This is the first NIH-funded clinical trial involving the prevention of noise-induced hearing loss.

“If we can even see 50 percent of the effectiveness in humans that we saw in our animal trials, we will have an effective treatment that will very significantly reduce noise-induced hearing impairment in humans,” remarked Josef Miller, co-lead researcher.

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Exergen files suit against Kidz-Med, alleges patent infringement

BY Michael Johnsen

WATERTOWN, Mass. Exergen recently filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts against Kidz-Med, the suppliers of the Thermofocus thermometer, alleging that the defendants have infringed five U.S. patents governing non-invasive temperature sensors owned by Exergen.

“I began working on heat-sensing technology back in 1980,” said Francesco Pompei, president of Exergen. “Since then [we] have developed non-invasive temperature sensors that are used in a multitude of applications, from home and professional medical thermometers to heat sensors used by NASA.”

According to the company, Exergen’s patented award-winning TemporalScanner temporal artery thermometers are used in more than 30 percent of hospitals and more than one million homes, with retail models being sold in Wal-Mart, Walgreens, Costco, Sam’s Club, Babies ‘R’ US and Toys ‘R’ Us.

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