HEALTH

Hyland’s teething tablets recalled

BY Michael Johnsen

LOS ANGELES Standard Homeopathic Co., which manufactures homeopathic products under the Hyland’s brand in mass retail, on Saturday recalled its Hyland’s teething tablets “in an abundance of caution due to an FDA investigation of its manufacturing facility,” the company stated.

Adverse events have been reported, but the Food and Drug Administration has said that a conclusive link has not been determined. The company, in working with the FDA, has identified manufacturing processes of teething tablets that can be improved to ensure uniformity in dosage. As a homeopathic product, Hyland’s teething tablets have a wide margin of safety that protects consumers from harm.

“We initiated this voluntary recall to ensure our consumers know that their families’ safety and health are our top priorities,” stated Mark Phillips, president and chief pharmacist of Standard Homeopathic Co. “We are committed to maintaining and deserving the trust they have placed in Hyland’s. We have worked for 107 years to build relationships with our consumers. We intend to preserve that tradition of trust.”

 

After in-depth analysis, a comprehensive review of the company’s adverse event report log and more than 85 years of safe usage, the company is confident that Hyland’s teething tablets are safe for infants and toddlers. Hyland’s teething tablets are manufactured in the United States and are distributed throughout North America.

 

 

In addition to the product recall, Standard Homeopathic Co. is refining its production, packaging and testing protocols. Throughout the process, Standard Homeopathic Co. will continue to closely monitor and evaluate the situation and consult with the FDA.

 

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CHPA names Melville its new president

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON —Scott Melville has been named the new president of the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, succeeding Linda Suydam, who is retiring after eight years with CHPA. The news becomes official Nov. 1.

Prior to the announcement, Melville served as SVP government affairs and general counsel for the Healthcare Distribution Management Association. Before joining HDMA, Melville was as an attorney and head of government relations for Cephalon. A veteran facilitator, familiar with health care and the vital role over-the-counter medicines and natural products play in today’s healthcare system, Melville also is a former staffer for Rep. Jerry Lewis, R-Calif.

At CHPA, Melville will have an opportunity to bring all of his decades of experience as a healthcare sector advocate to bear. With healthcare reform on the line and millions of baby boomers hitting their 60s, CHPA chairman Christopher DeWolf said that Melville’s “experience in public policy, coalition building and working with government officials and key stakeholders will be invaluable in guiding the industry through the rapidly changing healthcare environment.”

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Study: Consumers stay loyal to Tylenol, despite recent McNeil problems

BY DSN STAFF

PHILADELPHIA —According to a recent study released by the Relational Capital Group, consumer purchase intent and brand loyalty for Tylenol still is high despite the recent spate of Tylenol product recalls. According to the study, 76% of consumers reported positive purchase intent, and 67% reported positive brand loyalty for Tylenol.

That ought to be good news for Johnson & Johnson. During a hearing held earlier this month, J&J chairman and CEO Bill Weldon noted that McNeil Consumer would begin resupplying the recalled Tylenol products in the coming weeks and ramping up to traditional supply levels through first quarter 2011.

“As you look at the Tylenol situation, consumers are interpreting [McNeil’s] production problems as a short-term lapse in competence, rather than a significant change in what their intentions are toward consumers,” Chris Malone, chief advisory officer of the Relational Capital Group, told Drug Store News. “When we look at the Tylenol brand, it appears that there is such a long track record of reliability and trust, and a deep reservoir of good will,” he said, that consumers generally don’t believe J&J intentionally cut any corners in an effort to boost profits. In contrast, consumers generally identified both a lapse in competence and a dishonest pattern in the behavior of BP over the course of that company’s oil spill crisis.

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