HEALTH

Diabetes should be focus of healthcare professionals year-round

BY Michael Johnsen

WHAT IT MEANS AND WHY IT’S IMPORTANT There are many pharmacy retailers hooking their diabetes-related initiatives into the awareness generated by American Diabetes Month, but judging by a new study recently issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it may be time for healthcare professionals to begin piecing together initiatives that will help maintain that heightened awareness over the course of an entire year.

(THE NEWS: Supervalu encourages healthy lifestyles with diabetes program. For the full story, click here)

That study, published in Population Health Metrics, projected that newly diagnosed cases of diabetes incidence will increase from the eight cases per 1,000 people diagnosed in 2008 to about 15 cases per 1,000 people in 2050. That alone suggests more people will be in need of year-round nutrition programs, such as Supervalu’s “living healthy with my diabetes.” But if those projected increases in diabetes incidence are coupled with a decline in diabetes-related mortality rates, the CDC suggested that as many as 1-in-3 Americans will have diabetes by 2050, as compared with the 1-in-5 Americans who have diabetes today.

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Symposium addresses sexual dysfunction among women

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK Sexual dysfunction often is conceived as a male phenomenon, but it frequently affects women as well, and for a wide variety of reasons.

 

Such disease states as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and thyroid disease; drugs ranging from NSAID painkillers to narcotics to psychiatric medications; and even such conditions as stress and ADHD can all contribute to sexual dysfunction in women. But female sexual dysfunction often goes unmentioned, even though it may affect up to 50% of women, according to a 2003 Austrian study published in the journal Urology. Yet according to Semprae Labs, 90% of the women affected by female sexual dysfunction are reluctant to talk about it.

 

 

“We seem to be very uncomfortable,” Mary Jaensch, CEO of Semprae, said at a symposium for members of the press Thursday morning. The symposium, at New York’s Penn Club, was to promote Zestra essential arousal oils, an over-the-counter topical botanical product designed to stimulate sexual arousal in women. The symposium included such experts as Susan Kellogg, director of sexual medicine at the Pelvic and Sexual Health Institute of Philadelphia, and relationship experts Tamsen Fadal and Matt Titus.

 

 

“All women deserve sexual satisfaction,” Kellogg said at the symposium.

 

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NYT article: FSA changes shed light on old eligibility problems

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK A New York Times report published Tuesday illustrated exactly how far apart the rubber is from the road when it comes to incentivizing preventive healthcare practices and the implementation of the new rules associated with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Even as common over-the-counter remedies soon will require a prescription in order to be eligible for reimbursement under flexible spending account arrangements, tried and true preventive healthcare practices, such as breast-feeding, are not and in fact have never been considered eligible for FSA reimbursement, the report noted. “With all the changes the healthcare overhaul will bring in the coming years, it nonetheless will leave those regulations intact when new rules for flexible spending accounts go into effect in January,” the report read.

Breast pumps are not considered eligible FSA expenditures despite the fact that the American Academy of Pediatrics made a direct appeal to the Internal Revenue Service to define such products as breast pumps as a device used for medical care. In May 2009, the IRS determined that breast pumps do not diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat or prevent disease. However, the Food and Drug Administration regulates the manufacture of breast pumps as medical devices, and there are numerous studies that establish the preventive health benefits for children consuming their mother’s breast milk.

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