HEALTH

Abbott debuts EAS Peak

BY Michael Johnsen

ABBOTT PARK, Ill. Abbott on Monday announced the introduction of EAS Peak, a sports nutrition performance beverage that contains the company’s P3 technology, formulations that help sustain energy, increase workout capacity and protect muscles from breakdown. The P3 technology is a proprietary blend of beta-alanine, isomaltulose and HMB (beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate).

 

“Muscle fatigue and breakdown occurs with exercise – the harder you work out the more your muscles are affected,” noted Keith Wheeler, divisional VP performance nutrition research, development and scientific affairs at Abbott. “Leveraging years of nutrition science and experience with ingredients such as HMB, we’ve brought together a blend in the P3 technology that can help deliver extended energy, delayed muscle fatigue and reduced muscle breakdown. Using EAS Peak before a workout can help athletes prepare for, perform during and recover following a workout or competition.”

 

 

EAS Peak also is a source of high-quality protein (10g per serving). The ready-to-drink beverage contains 25 g carbohydrates (15 g isomaltulose), 150 calories and less than 1 g fat to provide energy and help support lean muscle recovery and replenishment following physical activity. The 16-oz., caffeine-free beverage is available in orange spark, peach surge and fruit power flavors.

 

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HEALTH

Drug-resistant bacterial infections reported in 20 states, worldwide

BY Michael Johnsen

ARLINGTON, Va. Drug-resistant bacterial infections recently have been reported in more than 20 states across the United States, and now are responsible for an outbreak in Tel Aviv, Israel, according to a report in USA Today on Thursday, citing information from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

The bacterial infections prove fatal in as many as 60% of all cases.

The outbreak in Tel Aviv has been traced to northern New Jersey, Neil Fishman, director of SHEA, told the national daily. The bacteria in question are equipped with a gene that enables them to produce an enzyme that disables antibiotics. The enzyme is called Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenamase, or KPC. It disables carbapenem antibiotics, or last-ditch treatments for infections that don’t respond to other drugs.

The infections are taking place primarily in hospital settings and have not yet spread to the general community.

The problem may be of greater concern than methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, given the number of alternative treatments that are available. The only drug that appears to make any headway against carbapenem-resistant germs is polymyxin, a medicine that has fallen out of favor with doctors given the toxicity to the kidneys, Fishman said.

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