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Study: Social, digital media have strong influence on retail traffic

BY Drug Store News Team

LAS VEGAS A new report by Jones Lang LaSalle indicated that social and digital media is essential to the new retail environment.

In the global real estate services firm’s report, “Get Connected — How to Harness the Power of Digital Media,” social media has changed how consumers behave, communicate, gather information, socialize and shop– advertising and media strategy is no longer a one-way, interruption-based activity and should be interactive, dynamic and provide value to the consumer.

The report found that 92% of consumer respondents rely on the Web to research and browse for products. That said, the company advises that e-mail marketing using coupon offers, sales, loyalty programs and e-marketing initiatives should not stand alone, but rather form part of a greater digital and social media plan to reach customers. Such social networking sites as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and MySpace map relationships among users and allow information sharing, the report said, and encourages consumers to create their own content.

Additionally, such offerings as mobile phone applications have made a stake in consumer outreach. Retailers have taken the cue and are rushing to develop apps that bring them close to their target market by offering useful tools to improve the quality and ease of the shopping experience, the report said.

“We must engage with our consumers rather than talk at them. The overwhelming reality is that social media is increasing across all generations and the rules have changed. We can now solicit customer feedback and interact with consumers directly and in ‘real time,’” said Greg Maloney, president and CEO of Jones Lang LaSalle retail division.

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Boehringer Ingelheim’s cancer drug may be ‘next generation’ treatment

BY Alaric DeArment

RIDGEFIELD, Conn. Data from a late-stage clinical trial of an investigational drug by Boehringer Ingelheim could show that the drug is a “next generation” treatment for cancers of the lungs, head and neck, BI said Friday.

The German drug maker plans to present results of a phase 3 trial of BIBW 2992 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago, which will take place between June 4 and 8.

BIBW 2992 is a pharmaceutical drug that targets the epidermal growth factor receptor and human epidermal receptor 2, also known as EGFR and HER2. Both are proteins that are known to promote the growth of cancer cells. BI said the drug shrank tumors in 22% of head and neck cancer patients, compared with 13% among those taking Eli Lilly’s and Bristol-Myers Squibb’s Erbitux (cetuximab).

The company also reported that the drug showed “significant” ability to fight tumors in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, and that 61% of patients with EGFR mutations had significant tumor shrinkage.

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Americans need more faith… in fiber

BY Michael Johnsen

WHAT IT MEANS AND WHY IT’S IMPORTANT Not eating enough fiber doesn’t kill you. But the disease states that result from a poor fiber diet do. Not a believer? Then you too may be a victim of IDS (irrational disbelief syndrome), the tongue-in-cheek faux condition that Fiber One touts as being the No. 1 cause behind America’s lack of fiber faith.

(THE NEWS: Lack of fiber in Americans’ diet caused by negative perception, Mintel finds. For the full story, click here)

The IDS condition may have been created out the mind of a General Mills marketer, but the lack of fiber in the typical American’s diet is real. As are the disease states that fiber deficiency can trigger such disease states as cardiovascular disease, colorectal and esophageal cancer, obesity, atherosclerosis, and coronary heart disease. A number of other less severe conditions is also correlated with a low fiber intake — elevated cholesterol levels, hemorrhoids, constipation, diarrhea and flatulence.

The real conclusion you can draw from this study is that Americans don’t know what they don’t know — fiber doesn’t taste good; only people suffering from digestive issues need to supplement their diets with fiber; all fibers are created equal. False, false and false. And that spells opportunity for a whole host of manufacturers in moving the needle around fiber education.

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