CENTER STORE

Hansen overhauls packaging

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK Just one week after it expanded its product line, Hansen has unveiled new packaging.

Hansen’s new can has more vibrant colors and changes the orientation of “Hansen’s” from diagonal to horizontal, giving it a more symmetrical and no frills look.

“We wanted the new packaging to be naturally delicious, just like our soda. We think that our new look is timeless and will last for another generation to enjoy,” said Blair Owens, VP marketing.

Hansen’s flavorful production line includes cola, diet original cola, ginger ale, key lime, cherry vanilla, grapefruit, kiwi strawberry, vanilla, mandarin lime, creamy root beer, raspberry, orange mango, pomegranate and black cherry. The premium soda maker’s products do not contain caffeine, preservatives or artificial flavors or colors.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
CENTER STORE

Planters introduces Flavor Grove line

BY Allison Cerra

EAST HANOVER, N.J. Planters has launched a new flavorful line of nuts.

Flavor Grove — which features nuts roasted with herbs, spices, and a variety of flavors — are beginning hit store shelves. Flavor Grove is the first Planters line of nuts to feature skinless almonds, Planters said. New almond varieties include sea salt and olive oil; nautrally-flavored chili lime and cracked pepper with onion and garlic. Flavor Grove cashew varieties include nautrally-flavored chipotle and sea salt and cracked pepper.

“People are looking for authentic and intriguing flavors and the snack aisle is no different,” said Jason Levine, senior director marketing for Planters. “And with Flavor Grove, we’re offering wholesome snacks that deliver all the great taste and quality people expect from Planters.”

Planters Flavor Grove almonds are available in 6 oz. stand-up bags and 1.5 oz. single serve pouches. The 6 oz. package retails for $3.49 suggested retail price, while the 1.5 oz. pack retails for 99 cents.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
CENTER STORE

Cutting sweetened beverages from diet may reduce blood pressure

BY Allison Cerra

DALLAS A new study published in Circulation, the American Heart Association journal, found that cutting sugar-sweetened beverages from one’s diet may lower blood pressure.

Using data of  810 adults, ages 25 to 79 years, with prehypertension (between 120/80 and 139/89 mm Hg) and stage I hypertension (between 140/90 and 159/99 mm Hg ) who participated in the PREMIER study, an 18-month behavioral intervention study with a focus on weight loss, exercise, and a healthy diet as a means to prevent and control high blood pressure. At the start of the study, the participants drank an average 10.5 fluid ounces of sugar-sweentened beverages/day, equivalent to just under one serving. At the study’s conclusion, average consumption had fallen by half a serving/day and both systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure significantly had declined.

“Our findings suggest that reducing sugar-sweetened beverages and sugar consumption may be an important dietary strategy to lower blood pressure and further reduce other blood pressure-related diseases,” said Liwei Chen, Louisiana State University Health Science Center School of Public Health and lead author of the study. “It has been estimated that a 3-millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) reduction in systolic blood pressure should reduce stroke mortality by 8% and coronary heart disease mortality by 5%. Such reductions in systolic blood pressure would be anticipated by reducing sugar-sweetened beverages consumption by an average of 2 servings per day.”

The PREMIER trial was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The present study is supported in part from the School of Public Health, Louisiana State University Health Science Center and from the Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?