BEAUTY CARE

Zeno Corp. expands management team, forms advisory board

BY Antoinette Alexander

HOUSTON Zeno Corp., the maker of OTC blemish-fighting devices, has expanded its management team and formed an advisory board to providing ongoing counsel as it gears up for growth.

Joining Zeno is Andrea DiNunzio as SVP, global marketing. DiNunzio has more than 12 years of beauty marketing experience and most recently served as CEO of Laura Mercier, a line of prestige cosmetics and skin care. Before Laura Mercier, DiNunzio held senior marketing positions at Johnson & Johnson, working on the Neutrogena business, L’Oreal and Avon. DiNunzio will report to Walter Klemp, president and CEO, Zeno.

To help build Zeno’s business internationally, Lee Stranathan, formerly SVP, marketing at Zeno, has been named SVP and president, international business. Stranathan joined Zeno in 2004 and has led international teams during his career at Zeno and elsewhere.

In addition, the company has formed an advisory board to provide ongoing counsel to the company. Board members include Melisse Shaban and Jill Scalamandre, both of Chrysallis. Shaban and Scalamandre each have more than 25 years of experience in the industry, including leadership positions at companies ranging from Revlon to The Body Shop to Prada Beauty to Avon. At Chrysallis, they were instrumental in leading the growth and development of the Frederic Fekkai hair care brand, and its recent sale to Procter & Gamble.

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L’Oreal Paris to shutter U.S. retail stores

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK Less than five years since opening its first retail store in Los Angeles, which was soon followed up with a second East Coast location, L’Oreal Paris has decided to shutter both locations on Feb. 28.

“Our two U.S. retail stores located at Beverly Center in Los Angeles and at Westfarms Mall in Farmington, Conn., created a unique retail experience that allowed us to experiment with innovative merchandising concepts and new forms of communication to the consumer. We are now exploring new, alternative venues to reach consumers,” L’Oreal Paris wrote in a statement sent to Drug Store News. 

In a letter e-mailed to L’Oreal customers, the company wrote: “All of our customers are an inspiration to us and we thank you for your patronage and the time you have spent with us here at the store. We appreciate your loyalty to the brand and look forward to you continuing to enjoy our products. Please note that L’Oreal Paris products can be found at all food, mass and drug retail outlets.”

Looking to better understand its shoppers and their buying habits and, in turn, improve merchandising at drug and mass, L’Oreal opened in the first half of 2005 its second U.S. retail store in Westfarms Mall. The first such location opened in the Beverly Center Mall in 2004.

The bright, spacious 2,000-sq.-ft. store at Westfarms Mall, which was visited by Drug Store News shortly after its opening, offered shoppers the luxury of browsing the entire L’Oreal collection in one location, where trained beauty advisers were on hand to assist them. Aside from helping shoppers find the right product, the advisers offered makeovers, and, through an in-store computer, could use cyber-imaging technology to see how a specific hair color would look on a consumer.

The products were priced at the high end of what a local retailer would sell them for so as not to undercut any drug or mass retailers. The manufacturer stressed that it opened the stores not to become a retailer, but to learn more about its shoppers. As a reflection of that mission, the company commonly referred to the stores as “Living Labs.”

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Report: Anti-aging skin care sales soar

BY Antoinette Alexander

CHICAGO Women’s quest for youthful looking skin catapulted anti-aging sales in 2008 to more than $1.6 billion, surpassing — for the first time — facial cleansers, according to recent research by Mintel.

The market for anti-aging skin care has grown rapidly over the past couple of years, per Mintel. U.S. sales rose 13% from 2006 to 2008, outpacing general facial skin care sales, which grew less than 11%. Mintel expects the market to remain robust over the next five years, growing some 20% through 2013.

“Anti-aging won’t fall to the recession,” stated Kat Fay, senior beauty and personal care product analyst at Mintel. “Looking young is extremely important to many women, especially Baby Boomers, and it’s not an issue they’re willing to compromise on because of tightened budgets. Many women see anti-aging skin care as a reasonably priced investment in their appearance and well-being.”

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