PHARMACY

Winn-Dixie regains lost ground with new pharmacy, design efforts

BY Jim Frederick

Nothing shows a retailer that its revitalization efforts are working quite like a thumbs-up from customers. For Winn-Dixie Stores, that vote of confidence came in mid-February, when its pharmacy business was among 40 U.S. companies honored as 2011 “customer service champions” by J.D. Power and Associates.

Winn-Dixie pharmacies have undergone a major transformation since John Fegan, VP pharmacy, joined the Jacksonville, Fla.-based chain two years ago. The rebuilding process, he told Drug Store News, began with “making sure we’ve got the right people in place, and giving them the tools that would allow them to interact with the patient.” To that end, the company invested in training programs both for immunizing patients and medication therapy management. Result: all but about 30 of its roughly 800 pharmacists now are certified to provide vaccinations, and some 400 are MTM-qualified.

Winn-Dixie has launched WD RxConnect, a centralized prescription record system. Also relatively new is an automated, phone-based refill reminder program and an optional program called Ready Refill that automatically refills maintenance meds. Capping the latest efforts was the unveiling last year of a store prototype that showcases the chain’s “Fresh & Local” market image.

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PHARMACY

Restructuring, new format fuse wellness, pharmacy at Weis

BY Michael Johnsen

Weis Markets streamlined its internal connection between wellness and pharmacy earlier this year with an organizational restructuring that folded the Weis Lifestyle Initiatives department, led by registered dietitian Karen Buch, into the grocer’s pharmacy division. It is the first official move by a supermarket retailer to literally draw a direct line between food and pharmacy.

“We’re looking to more closely align some of the initiatives in pharmacy, which are becoming much more service oriented,” Jeff Maltese, Weis’ VP pharmacy, told Drug Store News. “There’s an opportunity for us to leverage both of those healthcare professionals — [the registered dietitian and pharmacist] — under one department.” There’s also significant opportunity to develop prevention-minded programs for those health-savvy consumers actively looking to avoid chronic illnesses, Maltese added.

The Lifestyle Initiatives team has directed such projects as Weis’ Healthy Bites publication, a free monthly magazine and social media directive touting health and better-for-you recipes. That directive now will contain a more clinical focus, he said. “We’re also going to leverage [Karen Buch’s] knowledge to educate pharmacists about how better to speak to [customers’] dietary consideration for their disease.”

Weis Markets last year overhauled its flagship format, featuring a redesigned pharmacy that makes the pharmacist more accessible. The new floor layout incorporates a dedicated pharmacy consultation room that doubles as a vaccination clinic. Medication therapy management training for all Weis pharmacists will be coming this fall.

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Wegmans teaches pharmacists, consumers how to eat, live well

BY Michael Johnsen

Wegmans Food Markets last summer introduced “Eat Well. Live Well.” stations located adjacent to its pharmacies that help showcase the links between health, wellness and a good diet.

“There’s so much good science showing that people lower their risk of many health problems when they make healthy food choices and include regular exercise in their routines,” stated Brian Pompo, coordinator of wellness and clinical services for pharmacy at Wegmans. “That’s why we’ve created our ‘Eat Well. Live Well.’ stations near the pharmacy.” The teaching areas have food displays with a health story to tell, and they change with the season.

In warm months, such freshly harvested foods as berries, melons and tomatoes may appear. In cold months, foods that help fight colds and flu, such as orange juice or soups, might be on display. In between seasons, displays might feature low-fat and fat-free dairy products or heart-healthy whole-grain breads and cereals.

Wegmans’ registered dietitians regularly meet with Pompo to review current scientific research about food, health and wellness, and to develop reference materials for pharmacists. “We look for well-established findings about the healthful properties of given foods or food groups,” Pompo said. “There may be a display featuring Wegmans products containing omega-3s. We provide pharmacists with the education piece.”

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