BEAUTY CARE

Widespread acne drives sales of treatments

BY Antoinette Alexander

With some 40 million to 50 million people in the United States battling acne, it is no surprise that sales of acne treatments continue to be on the rise.

According to data from SymphonyIRI Group, a Chicago-based market research firm, sales of acne treatments rose 0.24% for the 12 weeks ended Oct. 7 at total U.S. multi-outlets, which covers supermarkets, drug stores, mass market retailers (including Walmart), military commissaries, and select club and dollar retail chains.

Going forward, sales of acne treatments will likely see continued growth as manufacturers bring new products to market, and consumers continue to battle the most common skin disorder in the
United States.

 

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Skin Care Sell-Through Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

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BEAUTY CARE

Men’s hair coloring, shaving sales increase

BY Antoinette Alexander

The beauty segment continues to celebrate the success of several stars, including nail polish, and men’s grooming is no exception. In fact, industry eyes are once again zeroing in on this vibrant category, as sales enjoy an uptick in such segments as men’s hair coloring and grooming/shaving.

According to data provided by SymphonyIRI Group, a Chicago-based market research firm, sales of men’s hair color for the 52 weeks ended Oct. 7 at total U.S. multi-outlets — which covers supermarkets, drug stores, mass market retailers (including Walmart), military commissaries and select club and dollar retail chains — rose nearly 3%.

Taking the top three spots, according to SymphonyIRI Group data, is Just For Men, including the brand’s Just For Men Autostop. Just For Men Autostop aims to simplify the hair coloring process
by combining everything needed into one tube. There is no need to mix any components.

The men’s grooming market, however, is still marginally skewed to men’s shave, and that is further evidenced by the robust growth of the grooming/shaving segment.

According to SymphonyIRI Group data, sales of grooming/shaving scissors for the same 52-week period rose a healthy 14%, fueled in part by strong sales of the Remington Pivot & Flex. Also helping to grow the segment, Gillette unveiled earlier this year its precision styling tool for men with facial hair. Dubbed the Gillette Fusion ProGlide Styler, it combines Braun’s trimming technology with Gillette’s blade technology to master a facial hairstyle with ease.

 

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Men’s Grooming Buy-In Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

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Made in America: ‘Buy local’ mentality leads to economic patriotism

BY Michael Johnsen

Made in America. To suggest that this marketing message doesn’t resonate with today’s American consumer may come off as sacrilege, especially considering how job creation was a central issue in this month’s presidential election.

But there are two questions marketers of “Made in America” have to ask. First, does this marketing message have staying power?  And second, where does it rank in a consumer’s purchasing decision tree?

The answers? Yes, “Made in America” will still be a differentiator after the economy fully recovers. But that differentiator does not yet outweigh other considerations like quality and cost.

“It’s a different person now shopping ‘Made in the USA,’” noted Dave Schiff, chief creative officer of the ad agency Made Movement. It’s not a guy driving an F250 with a gun rack in the rear window, he said. “It’s a person almost like an organic consumer — an enlightened consumer that realizes there is a lot of good things that happen on the tail-end of a purchase.”

“Made in America,” as a marketing message, may in fact be traveling along that path of products featuring “organic” on their packaging, noted Jay Forbes, president of The Forbes Connection. For 20 years consumers weren’t necessarily willing to pay more for organic, but as that message has penetrated the value-
oriented Walmart shopper, “organic” has become a premium position.
The same may be happening with 
“Made in America.”

Even though “Buy American” resonates extremely well with value-oriented shoppers, today the message is still just a tie-breaker when perceived value — quality and cost — are equal, Forbes said. “That is beginning to change with the severity of the economy,” he said. “People think local, and that mentality is starting to impact ‘Buy American.’”

According to research conducted by Perception Research Services over the summer, the majority of shoppers do take notice of such packaging claims as “Made in the USA” — 3-out-of-4 Americans said they were more likely to buy American because it “helps the economy.”

“There is definitely a sense of ‘economic patriotism’ around the idea of American-made,” suggested Dave Wendland, VP Hamacher Resource Group. But it goes beyond that, Wendland suggested. “Consumers will be willing to pay more for the safety and quality of 
American-made brands,” he said.

That may be the underlying message that will continue to resonate with consumers beyond a struggling economy. “When you go a little deeper and you see what are the kinds of products [American consumers] care about, … it’s about what people ingest — foods, beverages and particularly medications,” Jonathan Asher, EVP of Perception Research Services, told DSN. “Manufacturers aren’t necessarily thinking about it enough: If you make it here, make that clear.”

Click here to see the six companies profiled by DSN that sell on their American-made heritage.

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