BEAUTY CARE

What’s Next: Beauty oils get a makeover

BY Lonni Delane

The beauty market can be fickle, but the spin on beauty oils has been pretty radical even for the “hot or not” nature of the cosmetics industry. Not too long ago, promises of being oil-free were the way to move products off of the shelves. Oils were blamed for every bad thing, from clogged pores to terrible breakouts and greasy, unattractive skin. Fast forward to today, and oil-based skin products are riding high on the tidal wave of the natural movement. Simple, natural formulations with easy-to-understand ingredients are the order of the day, and chemical concoctions have been banished to the background.

Sarah Jindal, senior innovation and insights analyst of beauty and personal care for Mintel, notes that women in Eastern cultures have been using oil in skin care for thousands of years. She credits Japanese brand Shu Uemura with helping Western women warm up to the idea and beginning the trend by introducing their cleansing oils to American consumers.

“It was a smart thing to do in terms of getting Western consumers to adopt the concept of oil because they were rinsing the oils away,” said Jindal.

Natural, plant-derived oils have now become a staple in Western beauty and skin care. Some brands have even built their line around a marquee oil, most notably Josie Maran with her full line of Argan oil products for both skin care and color cosmetics. Tarte has had great success with its Maracuja oil. Not only are consumers looking for oils in different products, they also are using oils straight from the pantry. Coconut oil is one of the most popular as a multi-functional and cost effective way to moisturize, cleanse, remove makeup, condition hair and repair dry skin.

Natural oils also are getting a boost in popularity thanks to the trend for dewy, radiant skin. According to research from Mintel, oil is having a breakthrough as an ingredient in foundations to make the skin glow. It is a beneficial ingredient because it forms a layer on top of the makeup that helps skin to hold hydration longer, and it also helps the skin to look healthy and more elastic. Jindal noted that Bare Minerals was one of the pioneers of the oil serum foundation with its Bare Skin Serum Foundation. “From a textural standpoint, it’s very unique because it’s one of the first water-weight foundations with coconut oil as a hero ingredient,” she said.

Oil-based skin products are a natural extension for beauty brands that are known for natural and organic product formulas. Yes To has come out with Yes To Coconut, a line that features coconut oil and is marketed for the relief of dry, damaged skin and hair. The Honest Co. has its Body Oil made with over 95% certified organic oil. Burt’s Bees also has a range of oil-based products, including a Facial Cleansing Oil, Body Oil and Herbal Blemish Stick with Tea Tree Oil.


What’s Next is a weekly feature of Drug Store News, written by consumer beauty blogger Lonni Delane. The goal is to help give beauty merchants the cutting edge they need to stay ahead of the latest and greatest beauty trends.

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BIC marks 40 years of razors

BY DSN STAFF

SHELTON, Conn. — BIC is celebrating 40 years since it first launched its BIC Classic razor in 1975, and the company is touting its latest releases as examples of how far its razor business — which has manufactured 60 billion razors since 1975 — has come. 
 
“Consumers purchase BIC razors because of the high-quality shaving experience that they provide," BIC Consumer Products USA’s marketing director for shavers, Mary-Ellen Lacasse, said. “Through continuous innovation, we are able to offer the highest quality blades that deliver consistent shaving performance, all at a fair price.”
 
This year, the company released its BIC Flex 5, a flexible five-blade razor and a handle intended to give users more shave control. Additionally, in 2014 the company launched BIC Soleil Glow, a three-blade razor intended for women with a Comfort Shield to evenly distribute pressure. BIC says Soleil Glow provides the closes shave in the Soleil line. 
 
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MyChelle launches new Clear Skin collection

BY David Salazar

BOULDER, Colo. — Skin care company MyChelle Dermaceuticals is taking on acne with the six new products in its Clear Skin line. The line uses MyChelle’s NatureClear Complex, which combines prebiotic yogurtene with a probiotic, dermasyr lilac stem cells and PhytoCellTec’s grape stem cell extract to refine pores and revitalize skin. 

The collection, which is available at Sprouts Farmers Market, Whole Foods Market, Ulta.com and MyChelle.com contains:
 
  • Clear Skin Cranberry Cleanser ($16, 4.2 fl. oz.) — An exfoliating cleanser to deep-clean pores, containing pomegranate enzyme and willow bark extract;
  • Clear Skin Cranberry Mud Mask ($25, 1.2 fl. oz.) — A mask made of kaolin and bentonite clays, as well as colloidal sulfur, meant to absord debris, dirt and oil while helping reduce inflammation;
  • Clear Skin Pore Refiner ($28, 1 fl. oz.) —A product that can be used as a makeup primer using active stem cells to refine pores, tighten skin and increase shine. 
  • Clear Skin Spot Treatment ($15, 0.5 fl. oz) — A blemish treatment to reduce breakouts and minimize irritation containing colloidal sulfur, plant-based salicylic acid and Canadian Willowherb;
  • Clear Skin Balancing Lotion ($25, 1 fl. oz.) — A hydrator for skin prone to blemishes with daisy flower extract; and
  • Serious Hyaluronic Moisturizing Gel ($38, 1 fl. oz.) — An oil-free gel with hyaluronic acid, copper mineral and proline that can improve the elasiticity of skin and rehydrate it. 

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