PHARMACY

Emily’s Law elevates role of pharmacy techs in Ohio

BY Drug Store News Team

The Ohio Legislature’s passage of a law named for a young girl who died after receiving the wrong IV solution to require a background check and competency test certified by the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy for pharmacy technicians provides a new measure of safety for patients.

Emily’s Law, which Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland signed Jan. 7, elevates pharmacy techs from semi-skilled assistants to formally trained paraprofessionals, helping to ensure that mistakes like the one that killed Emily Jerry after a pharmacy tech made a prescription error with saline solution don’t happen again.

But even more important than that, Emily’s Law and other laws like it will help elevate the profile of the pharmacy technician in the mind of the consumer. And more so, it has members of Congress considering a federal requirement, which would be a welcome blessing to retail pharmacy operators; a one-size-fits-all, national certification standard is exponentially easier to implement than dozens of different requirements that vary by state.

According to the National Pharmacy Technician Association, pharmacy techs practicing in Ohio will have until August to become compliant with the new rules.

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PHARMACY

Rite Aid amending some financing terms

BY Melissa Valliant

CAMP HILL, Pa. Rite Aid on Friday reported that it is in the process of amending its Receivables Financing Agreement, an agreement originally entered into Sept. 21, 2004, through which Rite Aid sells substantially all of its eligible third-party pharmaceutical receivables to another entity, which then transfers those interests to various commercial paper vehicles.

The amendment extends a commitment that was set to expire Jan. 15 until Jan. 22, Rite Aid said in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

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Hiller’s Markets stops sale of tobacco

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK A chain of supermarkets in Michigan has decided not to sell tobacco products, according to published reports.

The Hiller’s Markets chain has stopped stocking cigarettes and other tobacco products, according to the Oakland Press. The family-owned chain operates stores in the Michigan cities of Union Lake; Ann Arbor; West Bloomfield; Northville; Plymouth; Berkley and Commerce Township.

Several other supermarket chains have also stopped selling cigarettes, including Wegmans Food Markets and DeCicco Family Markets.

Last year, San Francisco banned the sale of tobacco and retail pharmacies, but continued permitting it in supermarkets and mass-merchandising stores that operate pharmacies.

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