PHARMACY

Walgreens, Take Care Clinics continue to play active role in diabetes care

BY Allison Cerra

DEERFIELD, Ill. One of the nation’s largest drug store chains and its retail clinic subsidiary will offer patients free blood-glucose and A1C testing in honor of American Diabetes Month.

Walgreens said Thursday that the tests will be offered at more than 1,700 stores and Take Care Clinics nationwide on Nov. 12 and 13, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

As the diabetes rate in the United States reaches epic proportions — the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predicted that diabetes will affect as many as 1-in-3 adults by 2050 — Walgreens continues to play an active role to prevent this from occurring. Both in November 2009 and this past February, Walgreens and Take Care Clinics offered free blood-glucose testing for patients. More than 200,000 people were tested during these prior events, and more than 25% tested at-risk for diabetes.

“Walgreens recognizes the need to further heighten diabetes awareness, and by offering free testing in thousands of communities nationwide, we’re providing a valuable healthcare resource that may save lives,” said Kermit Crawford, Walgreens president of pharmacy services. “Through these events and through interaction with our pharmacists and Take Care Clinic nurse practitioners and physician assistants, we’re providing the tools and information to improve the lives of those at risk for or affected by diabetes.”

Each participating Walgreens will host an eight-hour walk-in clinic offering a free blood-glucose test or, in most states, for individuals diagnosed with diabetes, a free A1C test, the company said. Walgreens also added that its pharmacists, Take Care Clinic nurse practitioners and physician assistants are available for patient consultations. In most locations, they also will administer the tests.

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PHARMACY

Lupin’s generic Clarinex gets FDA approval

BY Alaric DeArment

SILVER SPRING, Md. The Food and Drug Administration has approved a generic treatment made by Lupin Pharmaceuticals for allergies, according to FDA records.

 

The drug is a generic version of Schering-Plough’s Clarinex.

 

 

Clarinex has annual sales of around $229 million, according to IMS Health data reported by several media in India, where Lupin is based.

 

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Lilly CEO: ‘New approaches’ must be found to combat diabetes

BY Alaric DeArment

CLEVELAND The CEO of drug maker Eli Lilly has called for a “wave of invention” to combat diabetes.

Speaking at the Cleveland Clinic Medical Innovation Summit, John Lechleiter said breakthroughs against the disease are needed as urgently today as a century ago, noting that the disease could create a “health and economic time bomb,” as 1-in-3 Americans are forecasted to have the disease by 2050.

 

Lechleiter talked about some of the developments in research on the disease, such as research on the genetics that can create susceptibility to it, new methods of insulin delivery, therapies that address both glucose control and cardiovascular problems, and the development of disease-modifying therapies.

 

 

Lilly was an early pioneer in mass-produced insulin in the 1920s, and in 1996 became the first company to win regulatory approval for an insulin analog, Humalog (insulin lispro [rDNA origin]).

 

 

“While the potential of research has never been greater, and the need for breakthroughs is more urgent, there are serious barriers to innovation,” Lechleiter said. “We must find new approaches that reduce the cost and time of drug development and deliver more value to patients.”

 

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