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Walgreens expands travel health services

BY Michael Johnsen

DEERFIELD, Ill. — Walgreens on Monday announced that it is now offering expanded travel health services, including immunizations and consultations, to support the nearly 60 million annual planned trips by U.S. residents venturing outside the country.

“Our pharmacists frequently interact with patients as they plan travel, and this is another way we can provide personalized services to help them best prepare and stay well while abroad,” said Jack Cantlin, Walgreens divisional VP, retail clinical services. “In addition to immunizations, there’s a lot of pertinent health information people need when traveling to other parts of the world. By expanding our travel health services and spending more time with patients, Walgreens can serve as a convenient resource for all international travel needs.”

Walgreens travel health consultations are private appointments tailored to each individual’s personal medical history, travel destination and other informational needs. Consultations include travel itinerary review and recommendations on immunizations, prescription refills and over-the-counter medications. Patients can select between a 15-minute consultation or the 30-minute consultation inclusive of immunization and medication refill recommendations, a personalized travel health report and development of reference and vaccination documentation required for travel in a number of countries. Prices for consultations vary and start at $19.99.

Travel health consultations and immunizations are available at select stores during pharmacy hours with a scheduled appointment. Pharmacists use published travel guidelines that are updated daily to provide travel health information.

Travel immunizations are widely available at more than 5,000 Walgreens stores in 41 states. Full travel consultations, which can include immunizations and other services, are currently offered at 1,500 locations, Walgreens reported.

Travelers also can schedule an appointment for travel immunization only. Walgreen’ suite of travel immunizations includes Hepatitis A and B, Japanese encephalitis, polio, rabies, typhoid and Yellow fever. 

 

 

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Lupin names chief corporate development officer for its global operations

BY Michael Johnsen

BALTIMORE — Lupin on Monday announced the appointment of Theresa Stevens as chief corporate development officer for its global operations. Stevens will assume full responsibility for global merger and acquisitions and specialty business strategy. Stevens has more than 27 years of experience in the pharmaceutical and biotech sector, with significant experience in managing strategy, corporate development, M&A and licensing.    

“I am very pleased to welcome Theresa to the Lupin family," said Vinita Gupta, Lupin CEO. "I am sure her rich experience in the areas of M&A and specialty strategy within the pharmaceutical and biotech industry sector will help Lupin’s growth plans.”  

Prior to joining Lupin, Stevens was with Aptalis as the chief corporate development officer responsible for M&As, strategy and global business development. Before Aptalis, Stevens was with Novartis for more than nine years, and held positions of increasing responsibility including head, global BD&L for general medicines, executive director and head, global BD&L for respiratory and dermatology business units and head U.S. business development and licensing, life cycle management and generic brand strategies. 

Stevens has a masters degree in biochemistry from University of Maryland and is a Juris Doctor from the Widener University School of Law. She started her career as a research scientist at Dupont and has practiced corporate law at Pennie & Edmonds. 

Earlier this year, Lupin had appointed Maurice Chagnaud as president-Europe and head of inhalation strategy. He had joined from Teva, where he was the VP Central and Eastern Europe. Lupin has been in the middle of preparing for a bigger push globally and is looking to take a deeper dive into the U.S. and European markets as well as fast growing emrging markets like Mexico, Brazil, Russia and China. The company also is targeting niche segments like inhalation, which is valued at more than $23 billion in annual sales, Lupin reported, citing IMS sales data. 

The company, which is in the middle of setting up a dedicated inhalation research facility in the United States, had earlier this year appointed Xian-Ming Zeng as SVP inhalation research and development. Xian-Ming also joined Lupin from Teva, where he was VP global respiratory R&D in the branded pharmaceutical products division since 2007.

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What are you doing?

BY Dave Wendland

Harkening back to managing an improvisational comedy troupe in San Diego and prior to that participating with a Milwaukee-based group, one of my favorite improv games was “What are you doing?” In this shtick, two performers stand together on stage. One begins performing a physical activity and when asked, “What are you doing?” describes an action that is totally unrelated. For example, one actor may be rigorously doing push-ups on stage while telling the other comic that they are performing a root canal. This incongruence is hilarious. 

Consider this as it relates to retail pharmacies and their appeal to shoppers in today’s fast-paced market. Imagine a pharmacy that you would expect to be focused on patient care, health, and wellness, which suddenly makes a totally incongruent decision that they will be selling live gerbils. Shoppers are caused to pause and ask the same question, “What are you doing?”

It is the race to attract shoppers and gain trips that is causing some retailers to lose their core identity which can potentially lead to puzzlement among consumers. Diversification is seldom a bad thing, but I am concerned that the portrayal of multiple personalities (something I refer to as the Sybil Effect) may alienate more core customers than it attracts new ones.

Family Dollar has certainly recognized that “value” is at the core of its DNA and is taking aggressive steps to reflect that in a series of moves that reintroduces food items at lower price points. CVS/Caremark may have realized a similar juxtaposition within its four walls as it boldly announced the removal of cigarettes from its inventory. Fred’s Super Dollar recently committed to putting more focus on wellness and accelerating its pharmacy presence throughout its enterprise.

So, for retailers, manufacturers, and distributors contemplating a strategic shift in direction, I encourage you to ensure that your next bold move is consistent with your business and that it doesn’t leave shoppers scratching their heads, asking, “What are you doing?”

 


Hamacher Resource Group vice president Dave Wendland, a 20-plus-year retail industry veteran, is a popular presenter and discussion facilitator available to speak at corporate and association events on a variety of retail-related topics. HRG is a research, marketing and category management firm specializing in consumer health care at retail. Product manufacturers, healthcare distributors, retailers, technology partners and others rely on HRG for strategic and creative solutions to help build their business. Learn more at www.hamacher.com.

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