PHARMACY

Walgreens drives accelerating renewal program to big profit gains in record-setting first quarter

BY Jim Frederick

WHAT IT MEANS AND WHY IT’S IMPORTANT — Everyone likes to be proven right. And Walgreens’ leaders are justifiably proud of the company’s record performance in first quarter fiscal 2011.

(THE NEWS: Walgreens drives accelerating renewal program. For the full story, click here)

Two years after launching a sweeping, top-to-bottom realignment of its management, its retail mission, its cost structure and its merchandising and marketing strategy, Walgreens rode its retooled business to a profit bonanza. Net earnings in the quarter ended Nov. 30 jumped nearly 19%, to $580 million, over the same three-month period last year. On a per-share basis, net income jumped 26.5% to 62 cents per diluted share. Sales also hit a record, rising 6% to $17.3 billion.

All this in the face of a still-weak economy, the continuing integration of the 257-store Duane Reade drug store operation that Walgreens bought last spring and a huge ongoing store remodeling effort as the chain converts its thousands of stores nationwide to its Customer Centric Retailing format.

Dow Jones called the earnings gain “much bigger than expected,” and cited a consensus estimate by analysts polled by Thompson Reuters forecasting that the company would earn 54 cents a share. Walgreens beat that estimate handily.

Also a factor in the solid profit performance: the company’s aggressive stock-repurchase plan, which it said added four cents a share to the bottom line in the first quarter. In that three-month period alone, Walgreens bought back another $510 million of its own stock.

As has been the case for many years, the engine pulling the train is the pharmacy, which now accounts for nearly two-thirds (65.8%) of sales. There’s always a risk in putting so many eggs in one basket, but Walgreens’ heavy reliance on its prescription business has, more often than not, paid big dividends through good times and bad. And being the nation’s biggest pharmacy provider — the company said it now has 19.7% of the nation’s total retail prescription business — is not a bad place to be in an aging America.

The first-quarter performance offers solid evidence that the company’s decision in 2008 to shift more of its retail focus and its resources to health, wellness and disease prevention — and away from store expansion — has been fundamentally sound.

In a time of 70 million aging baby boomers moving into their peak prescription-using years, and a time of a healthcare system in dire need of new solutions as it grapples with an unsustainable cost model, Walgreens wisely has repositioned itself as a solution. And with the nation’s largest private flu shot program, along with 8,133 “points of care” — including 7,529 drugstore pharmacies, 122 on-site hospital pharmacies, home care centers, specialty pharmacies and hundreds of in-store clinics and worksite health centers — the pharmacy and healthcare giant offers some pretty convincing numbers as it markets itself to employers and government health plans as a lower-cost, patient-accessible alternative to steadily rising healthcare costs.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Improving medication adherence is critical

BY Antoinette Alexander

WHAT IT MEANS AND WHY IT’S IMPORTANT — The CVS Caremark-sponsored study that illustrates pharmacists and nurses are the most effective healthcare "voice" in promoting medication adherence among patients is important because it marks the first step toward unlocking the potential of the collaborative care model (i.e., pharmacists and nurses), and getting those people who matter to pay attention.

(THE NEWS: Adherence is boosted by face-to-face contact, study finds. For the full story, click here)

The reality is that this message comes at a critical time. As the clock ticks away toward full implementation of the Affordable Care Act in 2014, and with Republicans in the new Congress determined to repeal or at least replace the parts of it they don’t like — even if they can’t — there is going to be a greater focus on how all this extra health care is going to get paid for and what America is getting for its money.

As Troyen Brennan, EVP and chief medical officer of CVS Caremark and author of both reviews, stated, "These findings offer payers, healthcare providers and policy-makers guidance about how to develop programs that improve patient adherence. We know that pharmacists and nurses are among the most trusted healthcare professionals. This study shows that trust translates into effective patient communications."

Improving medication adherence is critical, and fixing it would mean closing a significant financial drain on the U.S. healthcare system. Nonadherence to medications costs the healthcare system up to $290 billion — yes, billion — a year because many of the hospitalizations can be avoided if patients take their medications as prescribed.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Marsh implements generic drug pricing offer

BY Michael Johnsen

INDIANAPOLIS — Marsh Supermarkets recently implemented a $3.99/$9.99 generic drug pricing offer for 30-day and 90-day prescriptions, respectively.

The program applies to a designated list of generic drugs at commonly prescribed dosages (higher dosages cost more).

And it’s not the only pharmacy-oriented program being offered across many of the company’s 41 pharmacies. Marsh also is the exclusive supermarket supporting Project 18, a grassroots campaign to tackle childhood obesity. Developed by Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St. Vincent, Ball State University and Marsh Supermarkets, the program provides better eating choices and nutritional information for kids.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?