PHARMACY

Vortex Holding Chamber receives patent

BY Alaric DeArment

MIDLOTHIAN, Va. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has granted a patent to a device described by its manufacturer as being designed to optimize delivery of inhaled medications.

PARI Respiratory Equipment announced last week that received the patent for its Vortex Holding Chamber, a non-electrostatic holding chamber with one piece and two valves designed to work with a metered dose inhaler.

“We are very pleased that the Vortex Holding Chamber has been granted this U.S. patient because the Vortex Holding Chamber ensures patients do not have to worry about coordinating their breaths when using a MDI to get an effective treatment,” PARI president Geoff Hunziker said in a statement. “This enhances drug delivery, minimizes drug delivered to the throat and allows low resistance inhalation and exhalation with the device.”

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Taro files patent infringement suit against three companies

BY Alaric DeArment

HAWTHORNE, N.Y. An Israeli generic drug maker has sued three other companies, alleging patent infringement.

Taro Pharmaceutical Industries announced Monday that it had filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey against Synerx Pharma, DPT Labs and Karalex Pharma, alleging infringement of U.S. Patent No. 7,560,445. The patent covers Taro’s Ovide (malathion) lotion in the 0.5% strength, a treatment for head lice.

Taro said the defendants’ generic versions of the drug infringed its patent, and it’s seeking injunctive relief and damages.

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News article calls Mylan’s quality control into question; company responds

BY Alaric DeArment

PITTSBURGH A news article published over the weekend calling generic drug maker Mylan’s manufacturing into question has drawn a response from the company.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported Sunday that workers at the company’s Morgantown, W.Va., plant overrode drug quality controls required by the government by ignoring and deleting computer warnings of possible drug quality or equipment problems, based on a confidential internal report obtained by the newspaper’s reporters that called it a “pervasive” problem. Normally the warnings, known as “red screens,” require production to halt until a quality-control agent can investigate the matter.

The company responded by saying in a statement Monday that the Post-Gazette article was based on anonymous sources, improperly obtained documents and third-party commentary.

“Our customers and stakeholders can rest assured that whenever there is even the slightest departure from [a standard operating procedure], it will be dealt with immediately and effectively,” the company said in a statement. “This issue had no impact on the quality of our product.”

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