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VanaPain bulks up pain-relief line

BY Michael Johnsen

GM Pharmaceuticals recently launched 8-oz. bottles of its liquid pain reliever, VanaPain, which includes 16 servings of its daytime pain reliever and eight servings of its nighttime pain reliever. The new bulk products for the chronic pain sufferer began shipping in July, and the suggested retail price ranges from $7.99 to $9.99.

(For the complete category review, including data, click here.)

The original shot pain relievers, retailing at a suggested price of $2.99 per shot, are formulated with 870 mg of the NSAID choline salicylate and 65 mg of caffeine.

According to the company, caffeine added to pain relievers can make the remedy 40% more effective in treating headaches. And choline salicylate is absorbed five times faster than aspirin, the company added.

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External analgesics benefit from older pain consumers

BY Michael Johnsen

Who is the alternative analgesic pain consumer? “The majority of these people [in search of external pain relief] have chronic pain and are already taking prescriptions and using multiple methods of pain relief,” said Jenny McLaughlin, product manager for Walh Therapeutic Massagers. “Our research shows people are coming into the health-and-wellness area once a month.”

(For the complete category review, including data, click here.)

The external analgesic pain consumer typically is older. Headache tends to comprise about 30% of the usage occasions in the 18-to 48-year-old age group, John Incledon, president and CEO of Hisamitsu America, suggested. For consumers who are 50 years of age and older, “they’ve got a lot of maladies [and] co-morbidities that they’re treating; they’ve got to be thinking about drug-to-drug interactions. They also have to be careful that they’re not loading up on NSAIDs,” he said. “That’s why I think we see a more pronounced use in the older generation of topicals. Better than 50% of the business is in the 50 [years and older] group.”

New to the category are TENS devices, which stands for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. The devices use gentle pulses to stimulate nearby nerves and are thought to scramble pain messages to the brain, stimulate the production of endorphins (the body’s natural pain reliever) and improve blood circulation. Omron first entered the category with its Pain Relief Pro electroTHERAPY unit. Since then, Chattem has launched an Icy Hot TENS SKU, as has Carex, with a line called AccuRelief Pain Relief Systems.

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Excedrin excels post-relaunch

BY Michael Johnsen

Excedrin relaunched in the United States in 2013 and is doing well. The brand generated $130 million between its Excedrin tablets and Excedrin Migraine tablets for the 52 weeks ended June 15 across total U.S. multi-outlets, according to IRI. With those two SKUs combined, Excedrin is the No. 4 internal analgesic on the market, with strong momentum propelling the brand closer to No. 3 Bayer.

(For the complete category review, including data, click here.)

In 2014, three pillars are driving Excedrin’s continued growth, according to Julien Armilhon, Novartis spokeswoman. The first pillar is the company’s commitment to its retail partners. Second, beginning in February, Novartis launched a distinctive advertising campaign on the headache segment that emphasized the fast-relief effect of Excedrin.

The third pillar involves Novartis’ Migraine SKU. The company recently teamed with neurologists to create the My Migraine Triggers app, a free migraine tracking tool. It’s an interactive migraine diary that provides the user with reports to help understand which factors are associated with the onset of a migraine.

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