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Use of e-cigarettes among middle, high schoolers on the rise, CDC finds

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — More students in middle and high school are using electronic cigarettes, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Friday, the CDC said that between 2011 and 2012, among students in sixth through 12th grades, e-cigarette use increased from 3.3% to 6.8%.

E-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that deliver water vapor with nicotine and have been marketed as an alternative to tobacco cigarettes. While the Food and Drug Administration regulates tobacco products, it does not regulate e-cigarettes, and many states do not have age restrictions on their sale to minors, according to the CDC. While studies are ongoing, the CDC said some e-cigarette cartridges contain potentially harmful chemicals such as irritants, genotoxins and animal carcinogens.

The agency also found that among middle school students, the number of students who had tried e-cigarettes increased from 1.4% in 2011 to 2.7% in 2012, while habitual use of e-cigarettes increased from 0.6% to 1.1% during the same period, while use of both e-cigarettes and tobacco cigarettes increased from 0.3% to 0.7%. Slightly more than 20% of middle schoolers who had tried e-cigarettes reported never smoking tobacco cigarettes, while among those who habitually used e-cigarettes, 61.1% reported habitual smoking of tobacco cigarettes as well.

The figures were higher among high school students, as those who had tried them increased from 4.7% in 2011 to 10% in 2012, and habitual use increased from 1.5% to 2.8% during the same period. As with middle schoolers, use of e-cigarettes among high schoolers correlated with use of tobacco cigarettes, as only 7.2% of those who had tried e-cigarettes had never tried tobacco cigarettes, while 80.5% of those who habitually used e-cigarettes also smoked tobacco cigarettes.

Experimentation and recent use of e-cigarettes doubled among middle and high school students during 2011-2012, the report found, with 1.78 million students using e-cigarettes last year, while 160,000 of those who used e-cigarettes had never used tobacco cigarettes.

"This is a serious concern because the overall impact of e-cigarette use on public health remains uncertain," the report read. "In youths, concerns include the potential negative impact of nicotine on adolescent brain development, as well as the risk for nicotine addiction and initiation of the use of conventional cigarettes or other tobacco products."


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J.KESSLER says:
Sep-09-2013 01:59 pm

America's youth will experiment. (period). It's better that e-cigarettes are used rather than standard cigarettes. The study appears to ignore the fact that many e-cigs on the market contain the option of zero nicotine. Another point I would make is that any study that relies on truthfulness from middle-school and high-school aged children, regarding the term, habitual cannot be relied upon. Nor can their concept of the equal use of an e-cig be correlated to X number of actual cigarettes per day. The use of an e-cig is measured by puffs and/or end of flavor packet peiord of dissapation, (not battery life). The use of regular cigarettes is usually measured by # of cigs consumed during a day, regardless if how many cigs were put out at the half-point or lended out to others. In other words, the study cannot be relied upon. My final point is; where do middle-school children get the money to buy e-cigs? This is a parent issue, NOT an FDA or government issue. E-cigs have helped countless adults and I don't want to see our rights jeopardized due to faulty studies and overzealous save our youth compaigns that have never proved out anyway. Refer to first sentence.

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LDM network to deliver messages to Kmart pharmacists, patients

BY Alaric DeArment

ST. LOUIS — Targeted healthcare communications company LDM Group is adding Kmart to its network, LDM said Friday.

As part of the network, Kmart will offer its PharmacistCare and CarePoints messaging systems to pharmacists and patients, with the goal of improving patients’ medication adherence and overall health outcomes.

"Kmart has continuously shown that it represents a strong leader in the industry, and we are extremely pleased that they have joined our rapidly expanding retail network," LDM Group CEO Mark Heinold said. "Kmart’s continued focus on operational effectiveness, combined with its desire to enhance patients’ experiences in their pharmacies, will allow us to continue providing pharmacists and patients with trusted health information and ultimately improving overall health outcomes."

PharmacistCare allows pharmacists to stay abreast of new developments in the industry through direct messages in their workflow that they can communicate to patients. CarePoints are printed in real time — based on medication history and containing information about a patient’s prescription and condition being treated — and distributed to the patient by pharmacy staff along with the patient’s prescription.


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Musco Family Olive introduces portable olive to-go cups

BY Jason Owen

TRACY, Calif. — Musco Family Olive Co., a California-based supplier of table olives, introduced on Friday a new single-serve snack cup filled with black, pitted olives.

The Pearls Olives to Go cups are liquid-free and come ready-to-snack in easy-open cups. Each package contains four 1.2 oz. cups — similar to ubiquitous fruit snack cups. Each cup contains 10 large olives and carries only 40 calories, an ideal portion for both kids and adults, the company stated.

Olives to Go are available now on grocers’ retail shelves with other olive products. The suggested retail price is $2.99-$3.49/4-1.2 oz. cups. Olives to Go are gluten-free, dairy-free, sugar-free, cholesterol-free, GMO-free and vegan. The company also notes that olives are a good source of monounsaturated fat, which in studies has demonstrated to lower bad (LDL) cholesterol.

To celebrate the launch of the new snack cups, Pearls Olives is running a fall "Fun at Your Fingertips" photo contest through its Facebook page. Prizes include a MacBook Air, two iPads, three $100 app gift cards, or a year’s worth of Pearls Olives to Go. More details can be found on the company’s Facebook page.


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