HEALTH

Type 2 diabetes linked with cognitive impairments, study shows

BY Allison Cerra

WASHINGTON A small study conducted by Canadian researchers found factors that may link Type 2 diabetes with such cognitive impairments as dementia.

Older adults with diabetes who also have high blood pressure, walk slowly or lose their balance, or believe they’re in bad health, are more likely to have poorer cognitive functions than those without these problems, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Alberta in Canada and published in the September issue of Neuropsychology

The study of older Canadians — 41 adults with Type 2 diabetes, ages 55 to 81 years, and 458 matched healthy controls (ages 53 to 90 years) — found that systolic blood pressure, a low combination score for gait and balance, and a patient’s own reports of poor health all played a statistically significant role in the relationship between diabetes and cognitive impairment.

“Awareness of the link between diabetes and cognition could help people realize how important it is to manage this disease, and to motivate them to do so,” said co-author Roger Dixon, PhD, of the University of Alberta.

Type 2 diabetes has been found by other researchers to nearly double the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, said Dixon, who studies how health affects cognition in aging. As diabetes becomes more common, this heightened risk could dramatically hike the number of older people with dementia.

The prevalence of diabetes in the United States for people older than age 60 — according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases — is more than 23%, while Canadian prevalence is nearly 19%, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada.

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Kiwi Shoe Care goes back to basics with new ad campaign

BY Allison Cerra

EXTON, Pa. Sara Lee’s Kiwi Shoe Care is looking to educate consumers on how to care for their shoes with a back-to-basics approach.

Kiwi’s new campaign focuses on taking care of what consumers already have without breaking the bank, the company said.

"Our new ads will take a unique approach to drive home the concept of caring for one’s shoes and demonstrate the value and savings it can bring to one’s household," said Bob Clark, marketing director of Kiwi Shoe Care.

Kiwi’s line of products include shoe inserts, boot and suede protectors, shine sponges and women’s comfort cushions.

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FDA approves expanded use of Saphris

BY Allison Cerra

WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J. Merck’s supplemental drug applications for its atypical antipsychotic received approval from the Food and Drug Administration, the drug maker said.

Saphris now is indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia in adults, as monotherapy for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in adults, and as adjunctive therapy with either lithium or valproate for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in adults, Merck said.

Saphris initially was approved by the FDA last summer for the acute treatment of schizophrenia in adults and as monotherapy for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder with or without psychotic features in adults.

 

“These FDA approvals demonstrate our active commitment to further understand how our medicines can be used to help physicians help their patients, and we look forward to discussing these new uses for Saphris with the mental health community,” said David Michelson, VP neuroscience clinical research at Merck.

 

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