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Type 1 diabetes spikes among Philadelphia children, study finds

BY Alaric DeArment

PHILADELPHIA — While much of the attention to diabetes has focused on the dramatic rise of Type 2 diabetes among adults and children alike, a new study by a researcher in Philadelphia has found a spike in Type 1 diabetes among children as well.

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Professor Terri Lipman and a team of reasearchers found that the overall incidence of Type 1 diabetes in Philadelphia children younger than 5 years increased by 70%, and by 29% among children overall, between 1985 and 2004. The study appeared online in January in the journal Diabetes Care.

But while many hypotheses as to the causes for the increase had emerged, no risk factors had been confirmed, and Lipman said investigating risk factors was critical.

"The most rapid increase in Type 1 diabetes — in children diagnosed before age 5 — requires immediate attention," Lipman reported. "These young children are at the highest risk for death because of often-delayed diagnosis. The rapidly rising risk of diabetes in black children ages 0 to 4 years is of particular concern given the marked racial disparities that have been identified in diabetes outcomes and treatment in this population."

The study drew on data from the Philadelphia Pediatric Diabetes Registry, which Lipman has maintained since 1985 and which includes data on white, black and Hispanic children.

"The incidence of Type 1 diabetes in Philadelphia children has increased at an average yearly rate of 1.5%," Lipman said. "However, the incidence had been relatively stable over the first 15 years and has risen most markedly since 2000. The upward trend adds to the evidence of an increasing incidence of diabetes in the United States and worldwide."

According to racial and ethnic data, the incidence of the disease in white children had historically been stable, with about 13-per-100,000 diagnosed every year. However, between 2000 and 2004, there was a 48% increase. Hispanic children had been diagnosed at a rate of 15.5-per-100,000, but also saw a 27% increase.

For the first time, the Philadelphia registry from which the study data were taken also included cases of Type 2 diabetes. While the incidence of Type 1 diabetes is 18 times higher in white children than Type 2, it is only 1.6 times higher in black children, indicating a high incidence of the disease in that population. Historically, Type 1 diabetes was called "juvenile diabetes," and Type 2 was called "adult-onset diabetes," but those names have fallen out of favor as the latter has become increasingly common in children, largely due to the prevalence of unhealthy lifestyles and obesity.

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Reports: Obama re-nominates acting CMS administrator to lead agency

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — President Obama has re-nominated Marilyn Tavenner as administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, according to published reports.

The Hill, a Washington-based newspaper that covers Capitol Hill, noted that Tavenner had received an endorsement from House majority leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., who had worked with her when she was in charge of the Medicaid program in his state. Still, she could face a tougher time in the Senate.

Since her previous nomination, Tavenner has been acting administrator of CMS, the newspaper reported. Her predecessor was Don Berwick.

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Harry Lambert, retired Eckerd president, passes away after battle with Parkinson’s

BY Michael Johnsen

WAYNESVILLE, N.C. — Retired Eckerd president Harry Lambert, age 79, died on Wednesday, Feb. 06, after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease.

"Harry had a long and distinguished career as a leader of Eckerd Drug and the industry," commented the National Association of Chain Drug Store’s president and CEO Steve Anderson and SVP programs and member services Jim Whitman in a joint statement. "He was instrumental to the growth of Eckerd Drug and the creation of large national drug store chains. He also helped Eckerd become a leader in one-hour photo finishing [and] was among the first to recognize the synergies between the pharmacy and the rest of the store.”

He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Suzanne Ronsheim Lambert; children, William Albert Lambert, daughter-in-law Jan Lambert, Pamela Ann Rilling, son-in-law Robin Rilling, Laurie Ann Stokes and son-in-law Thomas Stokes; grandchildren, Nicholas Walker, Kelsey Walker, Sarah Lambert, Samuel Lambert, Jonathan Stokes and Abigail Stokes.

Lambert had retired from Eckerd in 1993. He was a prominent leader in his community, was honored as a Significant Sigma Chi, and received the Carl H. Lindner Award for outstanding business achievement. 

A memorial visitation will be held at noon on Saturday, Feb. 9, at Wells Funeral Home here.

According to the obituary filed by Wells, doonations in memory of his name may be made to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research. Sign into the guestbook on the site here

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