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Tim Cost joins PepsiCo

BY Allison Cerra

PURCHASE, N.Y. — A former Wyeth executive has been named PepsiCo’s EVP global corporate affairs.

Tim Cost, who will report to PepsiCo chairman and CEO Indra Nooyi, officially will join the company Dec. 1. In the newly created position, Cost will be responsible for strengthening and protecting PepsiCo’s corporate reputation and strategically aligning its communications, public policy, foundation, investor relations, global health and agricultural policy, and regulatory agendas.

Cost joins PepsiCo from APCO Worldwide, a public affairs and strategic communications firm, where he was EVP. Prior to that, he served as SVP corporate affairs for pharmaceutical company Wyeth, prior to its acquisition by Pfizer last year.

"As the role of corporations in society continues to evolve, it is critical that we be very thoughtful, strategic and consistent in how we reach out to our many different stakeholders," said PepsiCo chairman and CEO Indra Nooyi. "Tim is a very talented leader whose depth and breadth of experience will help us take a holistic view of our external relations and forge strong, productive and mutually beneficial relationships, consistent with our global commitment to performance with purpose."

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Breaking down the cereal code

BY Alaric DeArment

You’ve heard it before, and it’s true: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

Studies have proven that eating breakfast is closely linked to healthy body weights, improved mental alertness and physical performance. Plus, people who skip breakfast don’t make up for the missed nutrients later in the day.

Skipping breakfast not only deprives a person of needed nutrients, but the first meal of the day also helps refuel the body and brain with energy, and kick-starts the metabolism.

Cereal is a typically low-fat, nutrient-dense, cholesterol-free food that encourages breakfast consumption. That’s because children and adults enjoy the variety, flavors and textures, as well as the convenience of ready-to-eat cereal. In the United States, ready-to-eat cereal and milk is the leading source of 10 nutrients in children’s diets. And cereal’s role in a nutritious breakfast goes beyond the nutrients in the cereal itself. A serving of cereal serves as an excellent centerpiece for a balanced breakfast that includes fruit and milk.

For example, an average serving of Kellogg’s kids’ cereals with a half cup of skim milk contains 150 calories, or nine percent of the recommended daily intake of 1,650 calories for U.S. children age 6 to 11. By comparison, an egg, bacon and toast contains 253 calories, while a hard-boiled egg, ham and cheese contains 360.

Eating breakfast is not only important to start a healthy day, but it is also part of a healthy long-term lifestyle. Both children and adults who eat breakfast regularly are less likely to be overweight; a U.S. study of school children also found higher intakes of vitamins A and E, iron and B vitamins in those who consumed breakfast than in those who skipped the meal. The breakfast skippers were also less likely to achieve even two-thirds of their recommended daily intake for vitamins and minerals.

Ready-to-eat cereal is also often an important source of fiber, which is important since 90 percent of American adults and children aren’t getting enough fiber in their diets. Additionally, there is strong evidence that diets higher in fiber help reduce the risk of a number of health issues, including heart disease, obesity, diabetes and certain cancers.

Kellogg Company is committed to addressing this important need. The majority of Kellogg’s cereals in the U.S. are at least a good source of fiber (3 grams), and more than half also include a half serving (8 grams) of whole grains.

In addition to fiber, many health-minded consumers have also begun to monitor their sugar and sodium intakes. Fortunately, sugar in ready-to-eat cereals — including kids’ cereals — contributes less than five percent of daily sugar intake, plus adds taste, texture and enjoyment that encourages the consumption of important nutrients. For example, a bowl of Kellogg’s Froot Loops includes 12 grams — or 48 calories — of sugar. A glass of orange juice has more sugar, and the average fruit yogurt has more than double the sugar of kids’ cereal with milk.
Cereal also contains less than half the sodium of many popular breakfast items, including two slices of toast with margarine. In fact, ready-to-eat cereal contributes about two percent of the sodium in the U.S. diet. In addition, to address concerns about sodium, Kellogg has been lowering sodium for more than 10 years in products like Kellogg’s All Bran, Kellogg’s Corn Flakes, Kellogg’s Rice Krispies and Kellogg’s Special K, among others.

Ever since W.K. Kellogg invented flaked cereal more than 100 years ago, Kellogg has been recognized as a breakfast innovator. In fact, Kellogg has recently reformulated more than 100 products worldwide to add fiber, remove trans fats and reduce sodium and sugar, all without compromising taste or quality. And today, families around the world count on Kellogg’s cereals every day.

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Arming consumers to take control of breakfast

BY Barbara White-Sax

Today, American consumers are more focused on the foods they eat. They read labels. They understand the importance of fiber and whole grains. They know the difference between good and bad fats.

Better research, education and marketing have raised consumers’ nutrition awareness, yet many still fail to follow one of the most basic rules of good nutrition: Eat a healthy breakfast.
Studies have proven that eating breakfast is closely linked to healthy body weights, improved mental alertness and physical performance. Cereal is a typically low-fat, nutrient-dense food that contains no cholesterol and is a quick and easy way to start the day.

In fact, ready-to-eat cereal and milk is the leading source of 10 nutrients in children’s diets. And with more than 80 cereal choices, Kellogg meets consumers’ taste preferences and nutrition needs, including great-tasting choices for digestive health, weight management and heart health.

“Ready-to-eat cereal is one of the largest center-store categories and continues to respond well to brand-building and innovation. It’s proven that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, for kids and adults alike,” explained Doug VanDeVelde, SVP marketing and innovation of ready-to-eat cereal at Kellogg Company. “Consumers — especially moms — appreciate the convenience and nutrition of ready-to-eat cereal. New flavor options and innovations/renovations continue to meet family’s needs.”

For example, the importance of fiber to overall health is well-documented, yet nine out of 10 adults and children don’t get enough fiber in their diets. To help address this need, Kellogg recently added fiber to some of its most popular kids’ cereals — including Kellogg’s Foot Loops, Apple Jacks and Corn Pops — and to most varieties of Kellogg’s Special K.
Multiple studies support the benefits of breakfast. In particular:

  • Eating breakfast can help children do better in school by improving memory, test grades, school attendance and mood;
  • People who skip breakfast don’t make up for the missed nutrients later in the day;
  • Researchers revealed that people who do not eat cereal are more likely to have inadequate nutrition intakes; and
  • Research also suggests that eating breakfast may help lower overall daily caloric intake.

Consumers clearly need more information about how critical a healthy breakfast can be to their health and the health of their children. Thankfully, supermarkets and drug stores have already taken the lead.

More supermarkets employ registered dieticians to act as “personal shoppers” and provide consumers with information on how they can maintain a healthy diet.

Hy-Vee, for example, offers one-on-one nutritional counseling that includes supermarket tours to teach customers how to read food labels. The supermarket chain has also instituted a labeling system that helps customers identify better-for-you foods.

Dee Sandquist, a dietitian for the Hy-Vee supermarket chain and representative for the American Diabetes Association, said that consumers are “hungry for nutritional information” and that supermarket chains have been proactive in providing it.

For example, cereal provides important nutrition for people at all life stages. It helps children get valuable nutrients they might otherwise miss. For women of childbearing age, cereal provides necessary iron, calcium, fiber and folic acid, while the nutrient density of cereal helps elderly people get necessary nutrients for relatively few calories, which is important as calorie needs decline but nutrients needs do not.

So as retailers try to help consumers make the connection between eating breakfast and achieving better overall health, ready-to-eat cereals like Kellogg’s Corn Flakes, Special K and All-Bran are a great place to start.

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