PHARMACY

Teva relaunches Depo-Provera generic

BY David Salazar

JERUSALEM — Teva is reintroducing its generic of Depo-Provera (medroxyprogesterone acetate injectable suspension, 150 mg/mL) contraceptive injection. The drug is indicated to prevent pregnancy.

“This reintroduction brings an additional product to a market that was previously lacking in options,” Teva EVP and president of global generics research and development Dr. Hafrun Fridriksdottir said. “In addition to its importance to patients who will benefit from access to this medicine, this reintroduction holds significant importance to Teva and our generics R&D priorities.”

The reintroduction adds to Teva’s generic injectable business, which the company has been focused on growing. The drug had U.S. sales of approximately $211 million, according to QuintilesIMS data for the 12 months ended July 2017.

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Lupin’s generic Clobex lotion gets FDA approval

BY David Salazar

SILVER SPRING, Md. — Lupin is adding to its topical generics portfolio. The Food and Drug Administration has approved Lupin’s generic of Galderma Laboratories’ Clobex (clobetasol propionate, 0.05%) lotion, the company announced Tuesday.

The product is indicated to relieve various corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses in patients ages 18 years and older. For the 12 months ended June 2017, the drug had U.S. sales of $14.3 million, according to QuinitlesIMS data.

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Patient ID verification offers untapped potential in the battle against addiction

BY Bobbie Riley

I recently read an interesting Washington Post article about efforts to prevent people from abusing pain-killers prescribed for their pets. In response to this disturbing trend, states like Colorado and Maine have passed laws allowing or requiring veterinarians to check the prescription histories of pet owners.

This exemplifies how information can be an effective weapon in the ongoing battle against opioid addiction. Understandably, in seeking solutions, there’s an emphasis on the “what,” but we also need to look to the “who,” and this is where data and technology can have a meaningful impact.

At the pharmacist level, there’s a lot of effort dedicated to provider verification, as there should be. But it’s a different story at the patient level. And while millions of people truly need opioids to function, we must strike a balance between preventing addiction and fraud while allowing access and maintaining the integrity of the prescription process.

One area worth examining in this complex issue is how to determine if patients are who they say they are. Patient identification regulations and requirements vary by state. For example, Massachusetts requires a “valid government-issued identification” to pick up a prescription, but Illinois, while mandating a “valid photographic identification,” has no requirement that it be government-issued.

Technology provides the ability to verify a patient’s identity and, if needed, provide insight into their prescription history. However, retailers, know that adding another step means adding more time to each customer transaction, which can impact margins and interrupt workflow. Additionally, community pharmacists have grown their patient base through relationship-building and feel they know their patients.

Clearly, there’s a role and need for identity management platforms such as surveys that can be employed only when needed to minimize risk without disrupting workflow or the patient-pharmacist relationship.

Some identity verification solutions rely only on a patient’s financial information to pose a series of questions, but a deeper dive into an individual’s identity enhances security and helps prevent fraud. Tools like LexisNexis InstantID revolve around comprehensive profiles for more than 270 million Americans, including those who do not have a well-documented financial history. Employing such tools, when needed, provides a deeper, wider and broader perspective, relying on information that would be difficult for anyone but the patient/customer to know.

An identity management platform also can identify the scope and nature of activities related to the abuse and distribution of opioids. It can help spot patterns or connections, such as whom the patient knows, with whom he works or does business. Moreover, employing such a platform helps identify patients throughout the continuum of care, and, it helps to better ensure that the correct patient is receiving the correction medication he/she truly needs, prescribed by a properly licensed physician.


Bobbie Riley, RPh, is the vertical market lead, pharmacy, at LexisNexis Risk Solutions – Health Care
 

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