PHARMACY

Teva, IBM team to further develop Watson Health Cloud

BY David Salazar

JERUSALEM and CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Teva and IBM Watson Health announced Thursday that the pharmaceutical company had been chosen as IBM’s first Foundational Life Sciences partner for the Watson Health Cloud. 

Teva will use the Watson Health Cloud — an open-source platform for physiciancs, insurers and other health and wellness professionals — as a preferred global tech platform and will use it as a way of designing solutions for patients with chronic conditions. The two companies will also create joint research team that will use big data and machine learning technology to develop therapeutic solutions and disease models.

“Teva is actively exploring the e-health evolution with a strong focus on fulfilling unmet and emerging patients' needs,” Teva Pharmaceuticals’ SVP and CIO Guy Hadari said. “The IBM Watson Health Cloud provides a strong foundation on which we can realize this vision.” 

Watson is a computing platform that can interact in natural language, process huge amounts of data and learn from each interaction by uncovering insights and patterns. Teva will work to expand Watson Health Cloud’s capabilities and develop solutions to issues like drug musuce and adherence by drawing nsights from existing data.

“By building on the Watson Health Cloud, we believe Teva will be in a unique position to put the best information and insights in the hands of physicians, care teams and patients, to empower treatment optimization for individuals and populations across the spectrum of acute and chronic conditions,” Hadari said. “Watson holds promise to provide Teva with better insights, real-time feedback and options for clinicians to consider to improve patient care.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

PhRMA: Over 800 cancer treatments in pipeline

BY David Salazar

WASHINGTON — According to a new report from the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, biopharmaceutical companies are in high gear developing cancer treatments. The report highlights data from the American Association for Cancer Research’s annual progress report, which shows that there are currently 836 medicines and vaccines for various cancers in the pipeline.

These treatments include 123 for lung cancer, which the report says is expected to kill 158,000 people this year; 106 for different types of leukemia; 92 for lymphoma; 82 for breast cancer, of which there will be 231,840 new cases this year, according to the report; 58 for brain tumors; and 53 for skin cancer and melanoma.

“The oncology research community has made significant advances in identifying new, more effective therapies to help people with cancer achieve positive treatment outcomes and transition from being cancer patients to cancer survivors,” PhRMA president and CEO John J. Castellani said. “However, the battle is far from over. This new report underscores the sustained commitment of biopharmaceutical companies to address the unmet medical needs of patients fighting these terrible diseases.”

According to PhRMA’s report, since the early 1990s, the death rate among patients with cancer has declined 22%, with 83% of survival gains attributable to new treatments. Also a focus in the report is the growth of personalized medicine among cancer patients, and of the medicine being developed, 73% has the potential to be used as a personalized medicine.

“Oncology is on fire with [personalized medicine[, with treatment selections based on individual molecular characteristics,” Janet Woodcock, director of Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said. “This is also happening with chronic infectious, and genetic diseases are not far behind.”

To see more data from the report, see the infographic below. 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

NACDS, PhRMA research: Increased Rx use reduces Medicaid recipient’ health costs

BY Michael Johnsen

ARLINGTON, Va. — An article citing the positive impact of prescription drugs on reducing other medical costs in the Medicaid program was published Wednesday by the journal Health Affairs' September issue. 
 
“Proper use of prescription medications is paramount in helping to improve patient health, especially for those with chronic conditions,” Steve Anderson, National Association of Chain Drug Stores president and CEO said. “This research is further evidence of the impact of taking medications as prescribed – both in helping patients manage their chronic conditions and reducing emergency or catastrophic medical costs associated with medication non-adherence.” 
 
The article — “Increased Use Of Prescription Drugs Reduces Medical Costs In Medicaid Populations” — found that when prescription drugs are taken appropriately as prescribed by a physician, there is a reduction in other medical costs for certain Medicaid populations.  
 
Using data on more than 1.5 million Medicaid enrollees to examine the impact of changes in prescription drug use on medical costs, the research found a 1% increase in overall prescription drug use was associated with decreases in non-prescription drug medical costs for three distinct groups of Medicaid beneficiaries. 
 
Among blind or disabled adults, a 1% increase in drug usage was associated with a 0.108% decrease in total non-drug costs; for other adults there was a 0.167% decrease; and for children, there was a 0.041% decrease. 
 
These patients had one or more of the following eight chronic disease conditions that are non-communicable diseases and are treated with prescription medications:  hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes asthma or COPD, depression, schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, seizure disorder and gastroesophageal reflux disease.  
 
These findings further reinforce an estimate by the Congressional Budget Office that, for the Medicare population, a 1% increase in prescription utilization was associated with a one-fifth of one percent decrease in medical expenditures. 
 
The article was co-authored by Laura Miller, NACDS senior economist, along with Christopher Roebuck, president and CEO of RxEconomics, Samantha Dougherty, senior director for policy and research at Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America and Robert Kaestner, professor of economics at the University of Illinois at Chicago. 
 
One of a collection of articles in a Health Affairs special report titled “Non-Communicable Diseases: The Growing Burden,” the NACDS co-authored article was unveiled at a special briefing in Washington.  
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?