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Target emphasizes mobile experience with updated Target.com platform

BY Michael Johnsen
MINNEAPOLIS – Mobile is becoming the device of choice for today’s shoppers, Target noted in a release Thursday, and Target guests over-index for mobile usage. In addition, mobile traffic and sales have been key to driving Target’s digital growth, the retailer stated. 
 
Beginning June 2, no matter the screen size or device — mobile, tablet or desktop — visitors to Target.com will have a more consistent and unified experience, the company announced. 
 
Target previously operated two separate websites: one for desktop and one for mobile. The shift to one site means Target’s desktop experience will, essentially, be the same one that guests have seen on Target’s mobile website. Managing Target.com with one code base will enable the company's digital to make updates faster and more efficiently than ever before.
 
“People rely more than ever on their phones for everything in life, from interactions with friends to scheduling to shopping,” stated Jason Goldberger, Target’s chief digital officer. “We’ve talked for years about being a mobile-first retailer. This move takes us from mobile first to mobile only.”
 
The Target team has been methodically building and testing the new Target.com experience — which is built to adapt to screen sizes from desktop to tablet to mobile — since launching the site last year for mobile and tablet.
 
With the new upgrade, guests can switch more seamlessly between devices — even if they do so mid-shopping spree. In a recent survey, 80% of Target shoppers stated that they had started a task on one device, then switched to a different device to complete the task.
 
The overall digital engagement will be more visual, Target noted, with fewer words and descriptions. 
Last year, Target’s mobile conversion rate shot up almost 90% and is now higher than its desktop rate in 2013 — another clear sign that mobile is at the center of Target's guests lives and that they crave convenience, the retailer noted. 
 
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Walmart pilots same-day delivery through Uber, Lyft and Deliv

BY Michael Johnsen
BENTONVILLE, Ark. – Walmart is piloting delivery through Uber, Lyft and Deliv, Michael  Bender, EVP and COO, Walmart Global eCommerce, shared on Friday morning. "At our annual Shareholders Meeting, our CEO Doug McMillon will announce our newest pilot – a last-mile delivery test through services like Uber, Lyft and Deliv," he noted. "Walmart will start with tests of grocery delivery through Uber and Lyft, which we expect to start within the next two weeks in Denver and one other market."
 
This is in addition to a Sam’s Club pilot that started in March with Deliv involving delivery of general merchandise and grocery for business members in Miami.
 
"We’re thrilled about the possibility of delivering new convenient options to our customers, and about working with some transformative companies in this test," Bender wrote in a blog published Friday. "We’ll start small and let our customers guide us, but testing new things like last-mile delivery allows us to better evaluate the various ways we can best serve our customers how, when and where they need us."
 
For the customer, it's a seamless process. They order online, that order is compiled by a Walmart personal shopper, who in turn contracts with a local delivery driver to take the order directly to a customer's home. Walmart collects between $7 and $10 per delivery, Bender said. 
 
"At Sam’s Club, the process is very similar, with our personal shoppers preparing the orders for business members, and having their order delivered right to their door with Deliv," he noted. "Our members who have used it, love it."
 
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Parasol launches subscription service for disposable baby underwear

BY Gina Acosta

LOS ANGELES — A personal care brand is reimagining baby care for the modern parent with the launch of Parasol Disposable Underwear for Babies.

With a thin and ultra-soft design, both engineered and crafted to look and feel like underwear, Parasols aim to give parents a more meaningful option in baby care that's also highly absorbent and effective in preventing leaks and blowouts. The product is available via a monthly subscription box or for individual pack purchase. Parasol also offers a signature wipe: a thick, cloth-like baby wipe infused with organic aloe and refreshing cucumber.

"This is about the comfort through which your child experiences life," says CEO, Lisa Hom. "That's why we spent years developing a velvet-like topsheet to cradle your baby's skin, commissioning emerging artists to hand-paint our first season of designer inspired prints, and worked until we found the perfect balance of absorbency and thinness. What we ended up with was disposable underwear for babies – something beautiful, chic and thoughtful. It makes perfect sense when you consider the kind of experience and craftsmanship this new generation of parents demands from the products they use."

Parasol's Disposable Underwear for Babies comes in three custom collections: Delight, Discover and Dream, all designed by renowned artist Ashley Goldberg. The vivid colors and bold brush strokes of the inaugural collections balance playfulness against restraint, inspired by the timeless yet whimsical nature of parenthood itself.

All Phthalate-free, fragrance-free, alcohol-free and paraben-free, Parasol wipes are made in California and reflect the company's commitment to baby-safe materials, just as they do with their eco-conscious, responsibly made Disposable Underwear for Babies.

"We want young parents and their babies to be seen. We're creating the kinds of unexpected products for a fashionable, well-designed, deeply comforting childhood. The kind of childhood that modern parents want to give to their children," says Hom. "You don't do that by making the same thing everyone else has made for decades. You have to be daring."

 

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