PHARMACY

Take Care boosts visibility with multimedia advertising campaign

BY Antoinette Alexander

CONSHOHOCKEN, Pa. Take Care Health Systems, which currently operates 262 retail-based health clinics, has launched its first significant multimedia brand and advertising program since its acquisition by Walgreens in May 2007.

The campaign, dubbed “Life Diagnosis,” focuses on building healthcare around people’s lives. Starting this week, ads will appear across a broad array of media, including print publications, television, radio and online.

“Today’s campaign is our most visible statement yet of the company’s commitment to providing high-quality, affordable and convenient healthcare to all individuals,” stated Peter Miller, Take Care Health Systems president and chief executive officer. “Since we opened our first clinic in November 2005, our board-certified nurse practitioners and physician assistants have treated nearly 750,000 patients. Our clinics are critical entry points into the healthcare system for consumers. We’re helping America get healthy and we’re providing a great healthcare experience.”

The ads are meant to capture real life healthcare challenges and provide a “Life Diagnosis’ illustrating how Take Care Clinics can serve as a healthcare alternative for consumers looking for quality, affordable care that fits their schedule.

The campaign’s specific focus on cough, cold and flu coincides with the start of the cold and flu season, and all Take Care Clinics beginning to offer flue vaccines.

“The campaign bridges healthcare and service, offering patients a solution to manage their everyday health needs,” Heather Helle, chief operating officer for Take Care Health Systems, said. “Take Care Health understands the challenges patients face in today’s healthcare environment. We illustrate these real situations and offer real options for the healthcare consumer.”

Butler, Shine, Stern Partners, a marketing communications firm that was hired as Take Care Health Systems’ first marketing agency of record in March 2008, created the campaign.

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Medicare patients not getting cancer screenings often enough

BY Alaric DeArment

ROCKVILLE, Md. A study by researchers at the University of North Carolina shows that screening rates for certain types of cancer among older Medicaid patients lag behind national objectives.

The study, published in the Oct. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine and based on documented evidence, analyzed 1,951 Medicaid recipients in North Carolina aged 50 and older and found that physicians recommended screening for colorectal, breast and cervical cancer to 52.7 percent, 60.4 percent and 51.5 percent of patients, respectively.

Respective rates of adequate screening for the three cancers were 28.2 percent, 31.7 percent and 31.6 percent.

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Report shows Philadelphia has high rate of those treated for diabetes type 2

BY Alaric DeArment

PHILADELPHIA Percentages of people in Philadelphia who receive services to treat type 2 diabetes are higher than national averages. At the same time, the percentage of working-age people with the disease is higher in the city than the national average.

These are some of the results in the Greater Philadelphia Type 2 Diabetes Report for 2008, released Wednesday by the Greater Philadelphia Diabetes Coalition, which analyzed the demographics, costs and quality of care for people in the city with type 2 diabetes. The report included data from around the city’s metropolitan area, as well as western Pennsylvania and Atlantic City, N.J.

“GPDC helped develop the Greater Philadelphia Type 2 Diabetes Report to serve as a useful resource for employers, illustrating the seirous negative impact diabetes has on the Greater Philadelphia area,” GPDC chairman Dr. Ronald Brooks said. “This report points out the need to prevent diabetes through exercise and prudent nutrition as well as the importance that people with diabetes receive optimal care, based on evidence-based guidelines.”

The report also shows that 57 percent of Philadelphia residents in 2007 were between 18 and 64 years old, higher than the national average of 52.3 percent. In Atlantic City, the rate was 59.4 percent.

It also shows that costs for care of people with Type 2 diabetes are higher in Philadelphia than in the other five markets profiled. In 2007, the average hospital inpatient charges for treating Type 2 diabetics was $95,813, almost twice as high as the national average of $49,870. Hospital outpatient charges were $6,168, while the national average was $4,673.

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