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Susan Borra named FMI’s SVP communications

BY Michael Johnsen

ARLINGTON, Va. — The Food Marketing Institute on Tuesday announced the appointment of Susan Borra as SVP communications for the nation’s largest food retail trade association, effective Dec. 1.

 

“I couldn’t be more pleased to welcome Susan to FMI,” stated Leslie Sarasin, FMI president and CEO. “Her breadth and depth of knowledge about communications and the food industry will greatly benefit FMI and its members. … She has a tremendous capacity for handling challenging communications issues and great insight about issues important to food retailers.”

 

 

Borra joins FMI from Edelman public relations, where she was EVP and managing director of nutrition, food and wellness.

 

 

Borra will serve as a spokeswoman for FMI and will manage media outreach in support of FMI’s public affairs issues, programs, products, services and events. Borra will oversee all online communications, including the FMI website and social media accounts. She will provide communications expertise and counsel to FMI members and will direct the activities of the FMI Communications Committee and the Consumer/Community Affairs and Social Responsibility Committee.

 

 

Borra has more than 30 years of experience representing the food retailing and food processing industries. Previously she served as EVP at the International Food Information Council, where she directed the development of strategic communications programs and public affairs strategies about food, nutrition and food safety issues. She also led the development of consumer education initiatives and programs, and served as the president of the IFIC Foundation.

 

 

In addition to her communications background, Borra also is a registered dietitian and served as president of the American Dietetic Association from 2001 to 2002, and as chairman of the ADA Foundation from 1999 to 2000. She currently serves as chairman of the public information committee for the American Society for Nutrition and is active with the American Heart Association and the Institute of Food Technologists.

 

 

Borra’s career also includes a prior role at FMI when she served as director of consumer affairs. During that time, she was responsible for developing and managing the nutrition, food safety and consumer affairs programs on behalf of retail member companies.

 

 

Borra earned a bachelor’s degree in nutrition and dietetics from the University of Maryland at College Park, and completed her dietetic internship at Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore.

 

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Starting the day off right with both nutrition and convenience

BY Michael Johnsen

Families count on cereal for convenient, affordable nutrition.

Quickly prepared or eaten on the go, cereal is a convenient breakfast option for today’s busy families that also provides important nutrients.

Studies have proven that eating breakfast is closely linked to healthy body weights, improved mental alertness and physical performance. Plus, people who skip breakfast don’t make up for the missed nutrients later in the day.

As families look to save money by eating more in-home meals, breakfast — particularly the ready-to-eat cereal category — has become a more popular and important option.

Ready-to-eat cereal, like Kellogg’s Apple Jacks, Corn Flakes and Rice Krispies, generates nearly 54% of sales of all breakfast foods and prompts more than 12 shopping trips per year, according to mid-year 2010 data from the Nielsen Homescan consumer facts panel. That’s more than twice as many as any other breakfast foods category.

In addition, more than 92% of households made at least one ready-to-eat cereal purchase during the 12 months ended June 2010, with the typical home spending $66.69.

Consumers also understand the value of eating healthy food, especially for breakfast.
For example:

  • Sales of items that include flax or hemp seed were up 49.6% for the 52 weeks ending Sept. 4, according to Nielsen;
  • Sales of foods making antioxidant claims were up 26.6%;
  • Sales of foods making fiber claims were up 5.3%; and
  • Sales of granola/natural cereals, like Kashi, were up more than 9%, with sales rapidly approaching $250 million for what was once a niche category largely for shoppers of the natural foods channel.

Cereal is also a great-tasting option that meets consumers’ taste and nutrition needs. Children and adults enjoy the variety, flavors and textures, as well as the convenience of ready-to-eat cereal. Plus, cereal with milk is also the leading source of 10 nutrients in the diets of U.S. children, including vitamins A, B6, B12 and D, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin, folate, iron and zinc.

Fiber, a much-needed nutrient that 90 percent of American adults and children aren’t getting enough of in their diets, also contributes to overall health. Recognizing the important role of fiber in digestive health, weight management, heart disease and diabetes, the majority of Kellogg cereals are at least a good source of fiber (3 grams), and more than half also include a half serving (8 grams) of whole grain. And, at just 50 cents a serving for cereal and milk, ready-to-eat cereal provides convenient, affordable nutrition to help millions of families around the globe start their days off right.

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Big bowl of wellness

BY Dave Schulz

Now that more drug stores have moved into the grocery business, consumers are gaining more convenient access to food.

As a result, drug stores, which have always been synonymous with health and wellness, also have a tremendous opportunity to meet the nutrition needs of time-starved shoppers by stocking their shelves with healthier foods.

Food manufacturers, like Kellogg, see an opportunity for retail pharmacies to help reinvent the way groceries are merchandised to shoppers and help consumers make better decisions when buying food.

“Cereal is one of the best choices available,” said Doug VanDeVelde, Kellogg SVP of marketing and innovation for ready-to-eat cereal. “In fact, ready-to-eat cereal and milk is the leading source of 10 nutrients in children’s diets. Kellogg, which offers more than 80 cereal choices, continues to respond to consumer requests for better-for-you, convenient products that fit their nutritional needs.”

Since 1906, Kellogg has been providing consumers with high-quality, nutritious and great-tasting food, and Kellogg’s ready-to-eat cereal help millions of families around the globe start their day off right.

Studies have proven that eating breakfast is closely linked to healthy body weights, improved mental alertness and physical performance. Plus, people who skip breakfast don’t make up for the missed nutrients later in the day.

Additional facts support the importance of breakfast:

  • If essential nutrients are missed at breakfast, people don’t compensate for the loss at other meals;
  • Cereal is a typically low-fat, cholesterol-free food that encourages breakfast consumption; and
  • Breakfast cereal eaters have higher intakes of riboflavin, calcium, B vitamins, vitamin A and vitamin D.

In the United States, ready-to-eat cereal is the preferred breakfast with 82 percent of women and 79 percent of men starting their day with a cereal breakfast. Ready-to-eat cereal is also growing approximately three percent per year and is the third largest center-of-the-store category.

Drug stores are helping educate and assist consumers by communicating the relationship between breakfast and overall nutrition.

CVS, for example, is promoting its grocery initiatives to its ExtraCare loyalty cardholders with coupons, including one for Kellogg’s Fiber Plus cereals. Other Kellogg products that are logical choices for both in-store and coupon or sales circulars include Special K for weight management and All-Bran for digestive health.

In addition to nutrition, price is also a consideration among consumers, a trend that drugs stores are noticing.

“Consumers have become more conscious of their spending; this recessionary mindset has become part of their routine,” VanDeVelde added. “Today, there is an increased focus on brands that provide overall value, including elements of price, nutrition, education, health prevention and family appeal. Cereal and milk fit the bill perfectly. For these reasons, cereal will continue to be a focus category for retailers to drive store traffic.”

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