News

Survey: Half of women experiencing OAB report current treatment option not working

BY Michael Johnsen

IRVINE, Calif. — Nearly half of women age 45 years or older who experience symptoms of overactive bladder report their current treatment does not address their OAB symptoms, according to a recent survey conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Allergan.
 
Nearly 9-in-10 women surveyed report that OAB impacts their everyday life, and about 2-in-3 women have used some kind of treatment to manage their OAB symptoms, most commonly pills prescribed by a physician (31%). Despite the impact of the condition, about 21% worry about being perceived as a difficult patient if they are unhappy with a treatment plan.
 
Treatment often begins with such lifestyle changes as reduction of fluid intake, decreased amounts of caffeine, bladder-control strategies and pelvic floor muscle training. Anticholinergic medications, in the form of pills, also are often prescribed by physicians to manage OAB. In one study of 1,117 patients, the majority of patients (73.5%) stopped taking their pills within one year due to side effects and/or lack of results. 
 
An estimated 39 million Americans currently are living with OAB — a common, sometimes disabling, condition often associated with a considerable impact on patients with symptoms that include a strong, sudden need to urinate and urinary frequency with or without leakage.
 
In May, the American Urological Association released updated treatment guidelines for OAB, Allergan stated, which supports Allergan's Botox as an appropriate therapy to consider for the treatment of overactive bladder when self-management is not effective, and anticholinergic medications do not work well enough or are too difficult to tolerate. Botox works by calming the nerves that trigger the overactive bladder muscle, helping to reduce daily leakage episodes, treat the strong need to urinate right away and reduce the number of times needed to empty the bladder daily.
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Coty announces new nature-inspired fragrance

BY Ryan Chavis

NEW YORK — Coty announced the introduction of Wild Essence Halle Berry, a new fragrance that embodies the essence of a woman in nature, according to the company. Perfumer Claude Dir blended top notes of light citrus with a bouquet of freesia, linden blossom, white rose and cotton flower, with white patchouli and sandalwood also incorporated to add contrast.

“The essence of a woman is in body and soul and becomes more sensual in nature,” Berry said. “So with my newest fragrance I wanted to go deep into the rainforest where I could capture the primal richness of nature in an effortless scent. I love the idea of creating a fragrance that will allow women to connect with nature through perfume.”

The fragrance is supported with an ad campaign photographed by Cliff Watts, which plays into the product's nature theme. Wild Essence Eau de Parfum's suggested retail price is $28.00 for a 1-oz. bottle.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim’s Basaglar granted tentative approval

BY Ryan Chavis

INDIANAPOLIS and RIDGEFIELD, Conn. — The Food and Drug Administration has granted tentative approval for Basaglar (insulin glargine injection), which is used to improve glycemic control in adults with Type 2 diabetes and in combination with mealtime insulin in adults and pediatric patients with Type 1 diabetes.

Basaglar is Eli Lilly and Co. and Boehringer Ingelheim's basal insulin, which provides bloog sugar control in between meals and at night. The drug is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis, the companies said.

"The tentative approval for Basaglar is another step toward providing an important option for people with diabetes in the United States who need basal insulin treatment," said Enrique Conterno, president of Lilly Diabetes. "We believe insulin glargine will continue to be used widely for many years, and Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are committed to addressing the needs of people living with diabetes and providing support beyond the medicine."

While the FDA has determined that Basaglar meets the regulatory requirments for approval, it is subject to an automatic stay of up to 30 months due to litigation filed by Sanofi, which claimed patent infringement. Due to the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act, the agency cannot grant final approval until the end of the 30-month period in mid-2016, unless the court finds in favor of Lilly before such time.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?