BEAUTY CARE

Bloom to vendors: Fred’s is ‘open for business, poised for growth’

BY Michael Johnsen

MEMPHIS — There is a new team at the helm of Fred's Super Dollar, and besides a core focus on building a sound pharmacy base to drive that business, that new Fred's team is fast at work reorchestrating its entire front-end and store operations to support its more than 900 pharmacists who are practicing behind the back bench.
 
With the recent additions of Mike Bloom, president and COO, and Bryan Pugh, chief merchandising and marketing officer, the message for the supplier community is clear: Fred's is open to implementing the kind of profit-bearing partnerships across its more-than 660 store base that generate success stories for all involved. 
 
“Bryan and I just attended the National Association of Chain Drug Stores’ annual conference and conducted strategic meetings with about 50 of our top CPG suppliers in our industry,” Bloom told analysts last week. “Our message was clear. We are open for business and poised for growth. Come on down to Memphis and together we will develop a strategic business plan for mutual growth,” he said. "We also recently hosted the Consumer Healthcare Products Association here in Memphis for an immersion into the Fred’s story. We hosted CEOs, presidents and various senior executives from small- to mid-sized healthcare companies. We conducted a Fred's seminar and a store tour. The interest in Fred's and their willingness to partner with us to grow our mutual business is very positive."
 
Pugh — a former Walgreens product pioneer — and his team are implementing a new business review process designed to ensure the right assortment at the right value for Fred's customers. "We have completed 19 [category] reviews thus far and those businesses where we have executed the changes are experiencing anywhere from mid-single-digit comp growth to double-digit comp growth," Bloom said. "The process is working. We still have a lot of reviews to complete and the teams are working hard at prioritizing them through the balance of the year."
 
As a component of those business reviews, Fred's is addressing pricing, marketing and shelf presentation — which looks at where one brand goes versus another brand based on market share. "It's a pretty intense process and a lot of great dialog. And like I said, it never ends," Bloom said. 
 
Fred's is utilizing Nielsen insights as a basis for information, Bloom explained. "Where our customer is shopping, where she is purchasing items that she is not purchasing in our stores, market share, items not carried, we're doing a lot more competitive shops and visits, we're working closer with supplier partners to get their resources and information surrounding the categories, we have a complete new focus on new items," he said. "We're going to market faster with new items, which is very important, you'll hear me say, over and over new items drive comp sales in our business."
 
As Fred's focuses on retooling its front-end planograms, the company has placed its remodel program on hold. "We have made nice progress toward a new layout that will include new space allocation based on the new customer-focused need-it-now assortment, improved site lines and navigation as well as better adjacencies that coincide with the roll of the category and how our customer shops the store," Bloom said. "We anticipate having this new model up and running during the third quarter, so we can measure the financial results and the overall customer experience."
 
Fred's is also focused on store operations in an effort to improve execution and reduce out-of-stocks. "We have executed a new store cycle count policy that became effective in March that will improve in-stocks for our customers," Bloom said. "The policy has been in place for 15 weeks and we are starting to see in-stocks improve at store level. We have executed a new door-to-floor initiative for our stores to ensure that we are processing freight in a timely manner to again improve in-stocks for our customers."
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Survey examines how many customers are satisfied with their looks

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — Are you satisfied with your looks? According to new GfK research, 60% of people in the United States said they are “completely” or “fairly” satisfied with their looks — slightly higher than the global average of 55%.

Across all 22 countries studied, 12% went as far as saying that they are “completely satisfied” with their appearance versus 16% in the United States. In contrast, only 16% globally, and 13% in the Unite States, expressed any dissatisfaction with how they look.

According to the findings, complete satisfaction with personal looks is highest in Latin America, with Mexico, Brazil and Argentina all appearing in the top five for the percentage of population claiming this. The Japanese are the most critical of their own looks, with 38% not too satisfied or not at all satisfied, followed by the British, Russians and South Koreans (all at 20%).

In the United States, 21% of teens say they are “not at all” or “not too” satisfied with their appearance; only boomers in the 50 to 59 age bracket come close to this level of dissatisfaction. But the teen level is in line with the global average (20%) for that age group; and U.S. consumers in the 20 to 29, 30 to 39, and 40 to 49 age brackets are more positive about their looks than people globally. Overall, people aged 60 and older were among the least self-critical, both in the Unite States and worldwide.

The genders are about the same in terms of happiness with their looks; in the United States, 60% of men and 61% of women say they are either “completely” or “fairly” satisfied with their appearance. In the global measurement, both sexes came out at 55%. But U.S. women are slightly more likely than men to be displeased with their looks — 14% are “not too” or “not at all” satisfied, compared with 11% of U.S. men. This disparity is roughly in line with the global averages.

GfK conducted the online survey (face-to-face in Ukraine) with more than 27,000 people aged 15 or older in 22 countries. Fieldwork was carried out in summer 2014.
 

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Study finds both male- and female-oriented products sell better

BY Michael Johnsen

CORAL GABLES, Fla. – Consumers are more likely to buy products that are highly gendered — whether masculine or feminine – than they are to buy products that are not as gendered, according to a new study from the University of Miami School of Business Administration
 
The study, published in the April 2015 issue of Psychology & Marketing, found that consumers place a higher value on products that have been assigned a gender using aesthetic attributes like color, texture, weight and tone. For instance, if a product appears more "female" — shiny, smooth, colorful and light-weight — or "male" (angular and bulky with a dull texture) a shopper is more likely to perceive it as more functional and is more likely to buy it.
 
"We found that this was the case for both male- and female-gendered products regardless of the gender of the consumer," said Claudia Townsend, assistant professor of marketing at the University of Miami School of Business, who conducted the research with professors from the University of St. Gallen. "The findings offer real design guidelines for product makers."
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