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Sudafed announces app to help sinus sufferers

BY Ryan Chavis

FORT WASHINGTON, Pa. — The makers of Sudafed will allow sinus sufferers to join forces for a contest that will take place on the brand’s Facebook page, thanks to a new app.

As part of the "Open Up & Share" contest, participants will be able to use the Sinus Sketcher app to create and submit original sketches to creatively convey how sinus pain and pressure looks and feels to them. Entries for the contest will be accepted unil Nov. 24, 2013; five sketches will then be selected as finalists by cartoonist Liza Donnelly.

"As a cartoonist, I often find it easier to express my feelings through drawings rather than words, so I was excited to hear about the Open Up & Share contest," Donnelly said. "I also happen to suffer from sinus problems, so it was a natural fit to partner with the Sudafed brand."

Beginning Dec. 2, members of the Sudafed community will be able to vote for their favorite illustration. In addition to receiving a $5,000 prize, the winner’s artwork will be featured in a national advertising campaign by Sudafed.

In a recent survey by the makers of Sudafed, it was revealed that 53% of adults reported frequent sinus pain and pressure that impacted their personal and work lives. Additionally, 81% of sinus sufferers would give up things like social media access and vacation days for an entire year if they never had to endure sinus issues again.

Other findings from the survey:

  • 38% of sinus sufferers compared their sinus pain to being stuck in traffic; 35% said it felt like a balloon was about to pop.
  • 55% likened sinus pressure to an orange being squeezed by a juicer.
  • On average, those that are battling sinus problems go to work 15 days each year while dealing with a cold or sinus pressure and congestion.
  • 23% said that working is one of the most difficult things to do while experiencing sinus problems; 83% would rather go to work battling sinus problems than take a sick day.
  • 40% admitted that sleeping is one of the most difficult things to do while dealing with their sinus problems.
  • 70% of Americans in a relationship admitted to having a strategy to avoid getting sick from their significant other, such as no hugging or kissing.

 

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Survey: Sales of frequently purchased items boost consumer loyalty at retail

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — A majority of Americans repeatedly buy products that retailers have on promotion and many also say they would return to a brick-and-mortar store when alerted to upcoming sales of previously purchased items, according to a new survey by Synqera, a retail technology startup that develops big data-driven technologies to bring personalized online shopping experience to physical retail stores.

“We know there’s an appetite for customer engagement and retention through clear communication of promotions and sales both prior to the visit and throughout the in-store experience,” stated Filipp Shubin, COO of Synqera. “Consumers are still immersed in the brand experience while at the checkout desk and are ready to receive more information that’s relevant to them.” 


The survey, which was conducted Oct. 7 to 10, 2013 via Instant.ly among 1,018 online respondents aged 18 to 70, found that nearly 90% of Americans repeatedly buy products retailers have on promotion. Within the survey, 85% of respondents said they would return to brick-and-mortar stores when alerted to upcoming sales of previously purchased items.

While 92% of U.S. consumers use some kind of shopping list (68% specifically use or bring a paper list) to stay organized, most Americans frequently make unplanned purchases, and half describe themselves as impulsive shoppers, the survey found.

 With lines blurring between physical retail and e-commerce, especially during value-driven shopping on Black Friday and Cyber Monday, engaging consumers with actionable information at the right times to suit their purchase patterns is critical to combating showrooming, Synqera stated.



Other findings from the survey:



  • 96% of adults like to receive some sort of information from stores they frequent;
  • 

More than 4-out-of-5 Americans are more likely to return to a retailer if they were made aware of upcoming sales on products they previously purchased;


  • Impulsive shoppers are most impacted by discounts when making unplanned purchases;
  • Nearly half are influenced by in-store ads;

 Most shoppers prefer to be made aware of relevant information through email or traditional mail;
  • Nearly half like to be made aware at the store entrance;

 80% of Americans are interested in seeing/doing something while waiting to pay for their purchases;
  • Most would be interested in seeing coupons/in-store specials;
  • Nearly one-third would be interested in relevant partner/retailer promotions;


  • 85% of Americans believe that their grocery shopping experience could be better;


  • Nearly 2-out-of-5 believe grocery stores would benefit from new item suggestions that are in their price range; and
  • Nearly one-third would enjoy self-help kiosks where loyalty program accounts could be accessed.



 

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Vaccination against pertussis for adolescents may lead to fewer infant hospitalizations, study finds

BY Alaric DeArment

CINCINNATI — Vaccination of adolescents against whooping cough appears to result in fewer hospitalizations, according to a new study.

The study, conducted by researchers at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and the University of Michigan and published in the journal Pediatrics, found that hospitalizations for whooping cough, also known as pertussis, were lower than would be expected if they had not been inoculated.

"We know infants get pertussis from family members, including older siblings," lead study author and pediatrician Katherine Auger of Cincinnati Children’s said. "While it is encouraging to find a modest reduction in infant hospitalizations after the vaccination of adolescents began, there were still more than 1,000 infants hospitalized for pertussis in 2011."

The study was started after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began recommending in 2006 that all adolescents be vaccinated against pertussis; the CDC also began recommending vaccinations for pregnant women last year. The researchers used data from the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2000 to 2005 to predict hospitalization rates in the absence of the CDC’s recommendation. They then examined data from 2008-2011, finding that hospitalization rates for infants were lower in three of those years. For example, without adolescent vaccinations, the 2011 hospitalization rate would be 12 per 10,000 infants, but the actual rate for that year was 3.27 per 10,000.

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