HEALTH

Study unveils prevalence of condom use among Americans

BY Michael Johnsen

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. Condom use is higher among black and Hispanic Americans than among white Americans and those from other racial groups, according to findings from the largest nationally representative study of sexual and sexual health behaviors ever fielded, conducted by Indiana University sexual health researchers and published last week in a special issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

The study helped both the public and professionals to understand how condom use patterns vary across these different stages in people’s relationships and across ages, noted Debby Herbenick, associate director of the Center for Sexual Health Promotion, which conducted the study. "Findings show that condoms are used twice as often with casual sexual partners as with relationship partners, a trend that is consistent for both men and women across age groups that span 50 years."

 

One new feature to the study was the inclusion of teens — the study found that many teenagers actually practice abstinence. "Many surveys of adolescent sexual behavior create an impression that adolescents are becoming sexually active at younger ages, and that most teens are sexually active," noted Dennis Fortenberry, professor of pediatrics in the IU School of Medicine, who led the adolescent aspects of the study. "[But] many contemporary adolescents are being responsible by abstaining or by using condoms when having sex."

 

 

Another key finding highlighted in the collection of papers addressed intimacy health among older Americans, finding that many older adults continue to have active sex lives; however, adults older than 40 years have the lowest rates of condom use.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Study confirms safety, efficacy of OraMoist

BY Michael Johnsen

EUGENE, Ore. Quantum Health’s OraMoist, a time-released mucoadhesive patch that moistens and lubricates the mouth, was featured in the October 2010 issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association as part of a study that affirmed safety and efficacy of the over-the-counter product in relieving dry mouth.

The mucoadhesive patches tested in the study are available to consumers under the brand name OraMoist and are sold over-the-counter at such retailers as Rite Aid and Walgreens. Approximately 1 cm in diameter, the patches can adhere to any oral mucosal surface, such as the roof of the mouth or inside the cheek. The study confirmed the oral patch can yield a “statistically significant improvement in baseline subjective and objective measures of dry mouth for up to 60 minutes — and possibly longer — after application.”

 

“One of the results was that after two weeks of use of the patch, the amount of saliva in the mouth had increased even during times when there was no patch in the mouth,” stated the study’s lead author Ross Kerr, clinical associate professor at New York University College of Dentistry. “In other words, the patch would seem to have a cumulative beneficial effect.”

 

 

Chronic dry mouth is an under-diagnosed condition that can have a detrimental effect on oral health by contributing to tooth decay, gum disease and chronic bad breath, Quantum stated. The condition most often is a side effect of many prescription and OTC medications — 34% of people on three or more medications likely will have this condition. Dry mouth also can be a symptom of other medical conditions, such as diabetes or Sjogren’s syndrome, or can be the result of radiation treatment for head and neck cancer.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

NACDS issues statement on CMS’ withdrawal of AMP provisions

BY Allison Cerra

ALEXANDRIA, Va. The National Association of Chain Drug Stores commended the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on Tuesday after the agency proposed a rule that would withdraw two provisions related to pharmacy Medicaid reimbursement.

In a letter to CMS, NACDS said that it believed the average manufacturer price final rule was "fundamentally flawed, and implemented the Medicaid pharmacy reimbursement provisions of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 in a manner that was inconsistent with congressional intent," the letter stated. "Rather than continuing efforts to implement the flawed AMP final rule, we applaud the agency for moving forward with withdrawing the provisions of the AMP final rule, as well as the multiple-source drug rule."

Federal law defines AMP as “with respect to a covered outpatient drug of a manufacturer for a rebate period, the average price paid to the manufacturer for the drug in the United States by wholesalers for drugs distributed to retail community pharmacies and retail community pharmacies that purchase drugs directly from the manufacturer.” The current AMP policy almost could cause retail pharmacies to lose money on nearly every Medicaid generic prescription they dispense.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?