HEALTH

Study suggests soy intake can promote heart, bone health

BY Michael Johnsen

NORTHRIDGE, Calif. New findings published in the April issue of the Journal of Nutrition suggest soy foods can play an important role in promoting heart and bone health.

“Each year, the amount of research conducted on the health effects of soy and soybean components continues to impress,” stated Mark Messina, author of the report and professor of nutrition at Loma Linda University. “The research presented on soy and heart and bone health showed strong rationale for people to include soy in their diets.”

According to a meta-analysis that was part of the review, soy in the diet netted a reduction in LDL cholesterol of approximately 5%, which is in line with other data. Over time, a 5% reduction in LDL cholesterol can reduce heart disease risk from 10 to 15%.

“Although modest compared to cholesterol-lowering drugs like statins, the cholesterol-lowering effects of soy protein are similar to those of soluble fiber and certainly relevant from a public health perspective,” stated Messina. “Integrating a variety of heart-healthy foods – like soy, beans, nuts and certain vegetables – together into a healthy lifestyle are really the best approach to heart health.”

KelloggsDRSNhttp://www.centerstoregrowth.com

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Research concludes that current guidelines for blood pressure, cholesterol should be changed

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN DIEGO Recent research published in the Journal of the “American College of Cardiology” suggests that current guidelines for such risk factors as blood pressure and LDL cholesterol might need to be tightened even further, according to published reports.

The least amount of arterial fat were seen in those men who had the lowest levels of LDL cholesterol, the research found, examining data from 3,437 men.

Specifically, the least growth was seen in men with blood cholesterol readings under 70 milligrams per deciliter and systolic blood pressure (the higher of the 120/80 reading) under 120.

Current guidelines for blood pressure suggests that men at risk can have systolic readings as high as 140; recommendations of LDL levels is 100 for men at high risk of heart disease, with “consideration” being given to lowering it to 70.

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Research: Excess fat may put diabetes patients at greater risk

BY Michael Johnsen

CHARLOTTE, N.C. According to research published last month in the “Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism”, free fatty acids may be the leading factor in the development of insulin resistance and hypertension in obese patients.

In layman’s terms, there may be something to the fact that some 90% of newly diagnosed-diabetes patients are obese. And if obesity plays a leading role in the development of diabetes, then glucose may not be the only culprit in a diabetes diagnosis.

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