HEALTH

Study: Quitting smoking could breathe new happiness into life

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — Compared with those who continue to smoke, quitters are both happier and more satisfied with their health, both one year and three years afterward, than those who continue to smoke, according to new research published last week in the journal Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

Smokers hold strong beliefs about how stopping smoking will reduce their quality of life. Positive experiences of smoking cessation, including improved well-being, could be used by clinicians to educate and motivate individuals to stop smoking.

The authors assessed overall quality of life, health-related quality of life, positive versus negative emotions, relationship satisfaction and occurrence of stressors among 1,504 smokers taking part in a smoking-cessation trial in the United States. Smoking status and quality of life were assessed at both one year and three years post-smoking cessation.

Quality of life measures included health, self-regard, philosophy of life, standard of living, work, recreation, learning, creativity, social service, love relationship, friendships, relationships with children, relationships with relatives, home, neighborhood and community.

"This research provides substantial evidence that quitting smoking benefits well-being compared [with] continuing smoking," stated lead researcher Megan Piper of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. "Smokers might believe that quitting will decrease life satisfaction or quality of life because they believe it disrupts routines, interferes with relationships, leads to a loss of smoking-related pleasure or because cessation deprives them of a coping strategy. Our findings suggest that over the long-term, individuals will be happier and more satisfied with their lives if they stop smoking than if they do not."

 


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly DSN Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Goldstein Group unveils brand rejuvination for Bayer’s Neo-Synephrine

BY Michael Johnsen

MORRISTOWN, N.J. — Bayer recently engaged the Goldstein Group to rejuvenate the cough-cold Neo-Synephrine brand and improve the brand’s identity on shelf.

The brand design group employs such tools as its trademarked Shelf Sight Sequence, a packaging design service that improves shelf presence with "a visual vocabulary of proprietary colors, shapes, symbols and verbiage … to trigger the consumer’s purchasing impulse at first sight."

"TGG evolved [NeoSynephrine’s] on-shelf presence by increasing the ‘fast acting’ and ‘focused relief’ [that] NeoSynephrine provides by incorporating a stylized telescopic sight and spotlight effect into the brand’s logotype," noted Terri Goldstein, TGG CEO. "TGG also refreshed and realigned packaging elements to improve the impact of the product’s efficacy, benefits and range of offerings. Now, the brand has a revitalized shelf-strategy that may be quickly felt and understood."

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

STDs becoming more prevalent across baby boomer demographic

BY Michael Johnsen

PITMAN, N.J. — According to an article in the November/December issue of the journal Medical-Surgical Nursing, rates of HIV/AIDS, herpes, syphilis, human papilloma virus and other STDs are climbing steadily across men and women older than 50 years. 

"Unfortunately, the common misconception still persists that people over 50 are no longer sexually active," stated co-authors Lisa Jeffers and Mary DiBartolo. "As a result, healthcare providers often do not discuss risky sexual behaviors and STD prevention with middle-aged and older adults."

Jeffers and DiBartolo said some experts believe this age group is more sexually active than previous generations thanks to erectile dysfunction medications and hormone replacement.

"Initiatives need to be developed to assist older adults in coping with a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS and other STDs," the authors wrote.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly DSN Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?