News

Study: Long checkout lines negatively impact shoppers likelihood to return

BY Antoinette Alexander

DULUTH, Ga. — Many Americans would likely not return to a store if they experienced long checkout lines, according to new research from global retail technology company Omnico Group.

According to Omnico Group’s latest national primary research campaign, more than 77% of Americans would be less likely to return to a store if they experienced long checkout lines, supporting the perception that consumers who "want it here" expect to get it fast.

The Omnico study looked at how U.S. retailers are currently offering consumer-facing technology to aid retail decision-making and improve the customer experience. It found that after eight minutes, Americans are likely to abandon the checkout line and leave the store with no purchase. Although more patient than their British counterparts, who leave after six minutes, Americans are more likely to never return to that store as a result of the negative experience than their British counterparts.

"Although we have known for some time that retailers who actively focus on preventing abandoned baskets and checkout attrition see compelling benefits to their bottom line, the impact of long lines on longer-term customer loyalty is alarming," stated Bill Henry, Omnico Group’s CEO. "The retail landscape is changing as more retailers move to an omnichannel’s approach of embracing mobile POS technology. These are powerful tools to improve the customer experience and retailer performance."

With 74% of shoppers in the study owning a smartphone, the study also looked at smartphone adoption and how mobile technology is changing shopping behavior. It found that retailers need to bridge the gap between what consumers expect and what can actually be delivered. Similarly, the report picks up on the current big themes of the modern retail debate, such as whether to introduce line-busting mobile technology; how to deliver voucher and loyalty programs using the customers’ smartphone; and whether to embrace showrooming.

The findings also highlight the high cost to retailers in terms of sales lost, thanks to long checkout lines resulting from too few registers, and underscored the need for retailers to introduce digital solutions that nurture loyalty.

"Customers want technology solutions that join up the channels and transform the customer experience," Henry said. "Omnichannel solutions enable brick-and-mortar retailers to accelerate their growth in challenging conditions and provide new opportunities to win back customers from pure-play online shops. Retailers that embrace omnichannel technology and offer seamless customer journeys to the shopper have a very bright future."

Additional highlights include:

  • The top three technologies that will improve the average customer’s in-store experience are self-checkout, free Wi-Fi and "click-and-collect" (i.e., order online, pick up in-store) technology;
  • Controlling for price and reward programs are the best to encourage Americans to be loyal customers. Coupons also are well-received; and
  • Millennials, between the ages of 25 years and 34 years, lead the way in mobile use, particularly when comparing prices and shopping on competitive retailers’ websites while in the store.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

Dial announces new food-inspired body washes

BY Ryan Chavis

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Dial has introduced two new body washes, which were influenced by the rising popularity of vitamins and yogurt in food, the company said. The new Dial Vitamin Boost Body Wash comes in two varieties: Amazing B and the oil-infused Super C. Dial Yogurt Body Wash also has two variants, which include Dial Greek Yogurt and Dial Frozen Yogurt.

"For more than 65 years, consumers have trusted Dial to deliver high-quality products for the whole family," said Chris Sommer, VP marketing, personal care. "Our new body washes not only use exciting, new ingredients, but they also feature our innovative Moisture Balance formula for lasting, lightweight hydration to leave your skin visibly less dry without leaving a filmy residue."  

The new Dial body washes are available at grocery, drug and mass retailers nationwide beginning February 2014. The suggested retail price for a 16-oz. bottle is $4.99.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

Sweet Dreams collection makes its debut

BY Ryan Chavis

CINCINNATI — Procter & Gamble, in support of the National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep Awareness Week 2014, announced the launch of its newest fabric care line, the Sweet Dreams Collection. The products are formulated with ingredients that not only clean and soften, but help to create a relaxing sleep environment, the company said.

“It’s hard to unwind and turn off your mind at the end of the day especially when technology like laptops and smartphones are so readily accessible and easy to use in bed,” said Dr. Ian Smith, celebrity physician and wellness expert. “In fact, the use of electronics before bedtime is one of the biggest issues doctors notice in patients who struggle to relax in order to fall asleep. That’s why I recommend patients start with simple solutions I’ve tried myself like turning off electronics at least 30 minutes before bedtime and creating an ideal sleep environment, including washing linens and pajamas in the Sweet Dreams Collection.”

The line includes:

  • Tide plus A touch of Downy Sweet Dreams, available nation-wide for a SRP of $13.99 for a 48-load bottle;
  • Downy Unstopables Dreams, available for a SRP of $6.99;
  • Downy Infusions Sweet Dreams, available for a SRP of $4.99-$5.99 for 40 loads; and
  • Bounce Sweet Dreams, available for a SRP of $4.89-$5.99 for a 150-count box.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?