PHARMACY

Study: Intensive glucose control lowers long-standing Type 1 diabetes complications

BY Anna Mcgrath

NEW YORK Diabetic patients that begin their glucose control immediately following diagnosis will likely improve their long-term prognosis of Type 1 diabetes, a study published in the July 27th issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine concluded.

The 30-year study from the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications continued to follow participants from an earlier study from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, which had determined intensive glucose control to be the best way to prevent or delay Type 1 diabetic complications. EDIC continued to observe the patients to determine the long-term effects of prior intensive versus conventional blood glucose control.

Investigators compared overall rates of eye, kidney and cardiovascular complications in three groups of people, all of whom were diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and were generally 30 years of age.

The study found that the intensively treated DDCT participants faced lower complication rates compared with EDC participants.

“These data give clinicians a realistic description of the clinical outcomes they can discuss with their patients. When intensive therapy, now the standard of care, is implemented early in the course of diabetes, most patients with Type 1 diabetes should be able to avoid the disastrous long-term complications that were so common in the past,” said David Nathan, M.D. of Massachusetts General Hospital and co-chair of DDCT.

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Food industry vets commence new lobbying practice

BY Allison Cerra

WASHINGTON Policy Solutions, a new government and public affairs firm, has opened a practice in Washington, led by three food industry veterans.

The new firm will provide strategic advice to its clients and assistance in coalition building, grassroots program development, media relations, and in community outreach and corporate responsibility programs.

The three principals of the lobbying group include John Motley, former SVP government affairs for the Food Marketing Institute; Barry Scher, former long-time VP public affairs for Giant Foods; and Jay Truitt, former VP government affairs for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. 

“With both a new Congress and administration, there will be increased legislative and regulatory activity. Policy Solution’s principals have an extensive experience in working with both Congress and the Executive Branch on a wide range of policy issues, from food safety to energy and from taxes to health care,” said Motley.

For more information on this group, visit policy-solutions.net.

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Wegmans seeks to reduce paper usage for prescriptions

BY Michael Johnsen

ROCHESTER, N.Y. Wegmans’ SVP of consumer affairs Mary Ellen Burris on Sunday noted that Wegmans pharmacies are losing a significant amount of paper weight in her weekly online blog.

Wegmans pharmacies are eliminating pharmacy prescription information sheets for all refills, she noted, which would more or less result in 10 million fewer printouts each year.

“That’s the scoop on … you know, the enclosure with every single prescription that you probably don’t even read while you’re throwing it away,” she wrote. “Now, there are some you should read … a first time prescription, for instance. However, after you understand the precautions, use, side effects, drug interactions and storage (my favorite, for a recently prescribed drug: “do not store in the bathroom” which is where I keep all medical stuff) … such information is typically not really needed for refills.”

Completing implementation of new pharmacy software made it possible, Burris noted, making pharmacy prescription information sheets for refills, which consist of about 50% of the prescriptions filled at Wegmans, obsolete.

Essential information is still printed with each prescription filled, however.

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