CENTER STORE

Study: Healthy food shoppers want transparency

BY Joseph Tarnowski

Retailers looking to enhance service to their health-minded shoppers would do better to face their food products backward on store shelves, as ingredient lists and nutritional information trump brand names and package design among this demographic, according to a recent study by ECRM and HellaWella, a consumer healthy-living website owned by Lebhar-Friedman.

(Click here to view the full report with charts)

The study, based on a survey of approximately 750 participants, examined how consumers who are part of today’s healthy lifestyle culture perceive various food products and categories from a wellness standpoint, and how these perceptions drive their shopping behavior. HellaWella (HellaWella.com) provides news, research, product reviews and lifestyle tips for consumers interested in healthy and sustainable living, and surveyed its audience this past August on how they shopped for food.

What’s clear from the research is the fact that these healthy-lifestyle consumers spend more time reading labels, are willing to pay more and will go out of their way — including visiting several retailers during a single trip — to find the products that meet their wellness needs.

What’s healthy?

Trans-fat-free and low-sugar were among the most important food designations among those consumers surveyed. Interestingly, local came in third, just ahead of natural. While the local designation doesn’t indicate that food is healthier per se, there is the perception that these foods are fresher and better for the environment due to less fossil fuel consumed in their transport — a very important factor among healthy-lifestyle shoppers.

Not surprisingly, produce was cited as the top grocery department where respondents shopped for healthy foods, with the front-end checkouts — filled with candy, gum and soft drinks — ranking at the bottom of the list. However, prepared foods also ranked relatively low in importance among those surveyed. The respondents’ verbatim comments provide some insights into why this might be the case. First, many indicated that they are avid label readers, and want to know exactly what goes into the foods that they eat — such information is lacking in most prepared foods departments. More likely, however, is the propensity for these healthy-lifestyle shoppers to purchase individual ingredients and to make their meals from scratch.

Inside-out

When it comes to packaging, what’s on the inside is more important than what’s on the outside. A product’s ingredient listing and nutritional values far outweighed its brand name and package design — which actually had the least influence in driving purchase decisions among healthy-lifestyle shoppers. More than 65% of those surveyed ranked ingredient listing as “highly influential,” and almost half (47%) cited nutritional value as the same. This sharply contrasts with a product’s brand name — cited by only 5% as “highly influential” — and package design (1.8%).

When it comes to defining “natural” foods in the healthy-lifestyle shopper’s mind, it’s more a matter of what’s not in the products than what is. Among those items they considered most important for natural foods were that they are chemical free, preservative-free and non-GMO. Other attributes by which they defined an item as natural were organic, free-range, grass-fed and locally sourced. More than 70% of respondents said that it was important or very important to purchase natural foods — as they defined natural.

Loco for local

While locally sourced foods aren’t necessarily healthier than other foods, these products are nevertheless very important to healthy-lifestyle shoppers, and more than half of those surveyed cited them as “important” or “very important.” Not only do they view local-sourced products as fresher, but better from a sustainability standpoint, and by supporting local suppliers, they are also supporting their own communities.

Many of those shoppers surveyed have gone “hyperlocal” and said they’ve switched from buying their own produce to growing it, giving them true “farm-to-fork” transparency.

So, in addition to facing products backward, perhaps food retailers may want to add seeds and garden accessories to their produce sections.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
CENTER STORE

SABMiller, AB InBev reach agreement on acquisition offer

BY David Salazar

BRUSSELS, Belgium — Two of the biggest beer makers in the world will soon be merging, as news emerged Tuesday that SABMiller had agreed to the terms of Anheuser-Busch InBev’s latest offer to acquire the company. After several rejected offers, SABMiller has accepted AB InBev’s proposal to pay 44 pounds ($67.14) per share in cash per share of the company, with a partial share alternative for 41% of SABMiller’s shares.

The all-cash offer is a 50% premium on the closing price of SABMiller’s shares on Sept. 14 (the last business day before AB InBev started approaching the company with acquisition offers).

The deal would total around $106 billion if SABMiller’s board decides to move forward on the tentative agreement. 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
CENTER STORE

Mars unveils new offerings at NACS Show

BY David Salazar

HACKETTSTOWN, N.J. — Mars Chocolate North America this week has announced a lineup of new products that it will roll out in the next few months — news shared at the annual National Association of Convenience Stores Show in Las Vegas, Nev. Among the new products are a new variety of Snickers Bar and M&Ms — Snickers Crisper and M&M’s Crispy Candies. 

“Snickers Bar is the top-selling and fastest-turning item on shelf, so shoppers will be eager to pick up new Snickers Crisper,” Mars North America’s VP sales Tim LeBel said. “This new item — along with new M&M's Crispy Candies — answers consumers' desire for new textures, which has created a Crispy Crunchy Segment within the chocolate category.”

The full line of new snacks and products includes:

  • Snickers Crisper, which combines crisped rice and peanut beneath a layer of caramel, all coated in milk chocolate;
  • goodnessknows Snack Squares, which will be available in cranberry almond dark chocolate, apple almond and peanut dark chocolate and cherry almond dark chocolate;
  • Combos Baked Snack chocolate fudge pretzel, which have a creamy fudge filling inside a pretzel shell;
  • Dove Chocolate Fruit & Nut, which features fruit and spiced nuts in Dove chocolate and will debut in strawberry and cocoa almond, blueberry and vanilla cashew and raspberry and honey roasted almond;
  • M&M’s to-go bottle, which are reusable bottles that can be re-used and contain M&M’s or peanut M&M’s;
  • M&M’s relaunched Brand Box Pack format;
  • Milky Way Midnight bar, which will be available in a 2 To Go size; and 
  • Seasonal shapes of snacks like Twix Ghosts, Santas, Hearts and Eggs; Snickers Pumpkins, Christmas Trees, Hearts and Eggs; and Milky Way Simply Caramel Bunnies.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?