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Study examines correlation between ZIP codes, wrinkles

BY Antoinette Alexander

SKILLMAN, N.J. — Is your ZIP code taking a toll on your skin? According to new data unveiled by RoC Skincare, there is a correlation between geographic location and the formation of wrinkles.

“People are widely aware of the dangers of UV exposure, so a natural assumption is that the Sunbelt states would automatically be at the top of this list,” said New York City-based board-certified dermatologist, Dr. Erin Gilbert, MD, PhD, FAAD. “However, we sometimes forget that there are a number of regionally based factors — not getting enough rest or working late hours — that also can take a toll on your skin.”

Created in partnership with independent research firm Sperling’s BestPlaces, the RoC Skincare Wrinkle Ranking Study outlined the 50 most wrinkle-prone regions in the United States and the underlying factors that may cause skin to age. To identify which U.S. residents are most susceptible to wrinkles, RoC Skincare conducted a meta-analysis of original and existing research to assess the impact of lifestyle, occupational and environmental elements on skin by region. In addition to factors commonly known to cause skin damage, such as climate and pollution, the study also weighed unique criteria, including stress levels, traffic commutes and diet.

While investigating which factors had the most impact on a region’s ranking, the study results showed that no two areas’ risk for aging skin are identical, despite proximity or similarities among cities:

  • Riverside, Calif., and San Diego, Calif., are only two hours apart, but on opposite ends of the Wrinkle Ranking scale. Why? Riverside was placed first for having an above average number of sunny days, while the mild Pacific climate landed “America’s Finest City” in last place;
  • New York can proudly call itself the “Big Apple” for being the most populated region in the country. However, residents have the longest commute and third-highest number of sleepless nights, elevating Gotham City to the second most wrinkle-prone in America; and
  • Denver earned the sixth position for scoring highest in the environment category. Mile-High City’s residents have one of the highest skin cancer rates because of the thin air quality, which is less able to absorb skin-damaging UV rays.

Where does your city rank? To view the full RoC Skincare Wrinkle Ranking, click here.

 

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QS/1 unveils ESI Rx History interface

BY Antoinette Alexander

SPARTANBURG, S.C. — QS/1 is now offering the ESI Rx History interface, a medication reconciliation program allowing healthcare professionals to instantly retrieve a patient’s medication history.

Once setup, the ESI Rx History interface will allow pharmacies to provide a patient’s medication history automatically through QS/1’s PowerLine. The information is stored on ESI’s repository of retail prescription claims and is electronically delivered by ESI in real time when requested at the patient’s point of care.

“We are excited to offer this new interface,” stated Michael Ziegler, QS/1’s senior manager for marketing and analyst. “Using ESI Rx History will allow pharmacies to add their patient’s information to the database. If the patient ever is admitted to a hospital, this will give doctors immediate access to the most current medications the patient is taking.”

This service not only saves time for the caregiver, but also improves accuracy since the medication data is pulled directly from the patient’s information.

“Medical errors can increase during this critical handoff to a hospital or LTC facility,” Ziegler added. “This new interface ensures accurate information is delivered and can speed up the admission process.”
 

 

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Report: New Kansas law allows for ‘collaborative agreements’ for pharmacists

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — Pharmacists in Kansas will be able to play a greater collaborative role in patient care under a new law that will take effect in July, according to a local news report.

Legislature approved the law earlier this year, allowing for the creation of “collaborative agreements” for pharmacists to start and modify drug therapies for patients under the supervision of a physician, the Wichita Eagle reported. Pharmacists also will be able to use their expertise to supplement the work of physicians.

The law, which could mean more roles for pharmacists in clinic-based practices and teams, came about after the Kansas State Board of Pharmacy saw a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that said Kansas was 1-of-4 states in the country with laws that “authorized extremely limited collaborative practice,” Debra Billingsley, executive director of the Kansas State Board of Pharmacy, was quoted as saying.

 

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