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Study: African-American women have 10x greater risk of diabetes if diagnosed with gestational diabetes

BY Michael Johnsen

PASADENA, Calif. — African-American women who develop gestational diabetes mellitus during pregnancy face a 52% increased risk of developing diabetes in the future, compared with white women who develop GDM during pregnancy, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published online Thursday in the journal Diabetologia.

African-American women are less likely to develop GDM during pregnancy, but for those who were diagnosed with having GDM, their future overt diabetes risk is the greatest among all race/ethnic groups. Although Asian/Pacific Islander women are much more likely to develop GDM than African-American or non-Hispanic white women, their future diabetes risk after GDM is similar to that for non-Hispanic white women, the study found.

"Race and ethnicity should be considered among the risk factors for Type 2 diabetes when physicians and nurses counsel women about their risk of developing diabetes after a pregnancy complicated by GDM," stated study lead author Anny Xiang, a senior research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Department of Research and Evaluation.

This study, which consisted of 77,666 ethnically diverse women who gave birth from 1995 to 2009, found that African-American women who developed GDM had the highest risk of developing overt diabetes in the future in comparison with women from other racial and ethnic groups. For African-American women, their risk of developing diabetes was almost 10 times greater if they had developed GDM during a past pregnancy than if they did not develop GDM. In comparison, the relative risks were 6.5 times greater for non-Hispanic White women, 7.7 times greater for Hispanic women and 6.3 times greater in Asian/Pacific Islander women.

GDM is defined as glucose intolerance that typically occurs during the second or third trimester and most prevalent in Asian/Pacific Islanders (17% in the study population) and least prevalent in African-American women (7% in the study population). GDM can lead to such complications as early delivery and cesarean delivery and increases the baby’s risk of developing diabetes, obesity and metabolic disease later in life. GDM typically goes away after pregnancy but risk of overt diabetes in the future is a concern.

"All women diagnosed with GDM should be screened for diabetes soon after their delivery and subsequently at regular intervals," Xiang said. "These women would benefit from lifestyle changes such as changes in diet and increases in physical activity that can reduce diabetes risk. … Our study shows that prevention messages, while important to all women who develop GDM, are particularly important for African-American women."


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Bristol-Myers Squibb announces executive changes

BY DSN STAFF

NEW YORK — Bristol-Myers Squibb announced changes to its senior management team, including the appointment of its U.S. pharmaceuticals president.

The drug maker said SVP oncology and immunology global commercialization Giovanni Caforio has been promoted to president of U.S. pharmaceuticals. Additionally, Bristol named Charles Bancroft and Béatrice Cazala as EVPs. Bancroft will add to his role of CFO operational responsibility for the pharmaceutical business in Latin America, Middle East, Africa, Canada, Japan and several other countries in the Pacific Rim. Meanwhile, Cazala will add responsibility for global policy to her role leading global commercialization, Europe and emerging markets.

In related news, Anthony Hooper, SVP commercial operations and president of U.S., Japan and intercontinental, has decided to leave the company. He has joined Amgen as EVP global commercial operations.

All of the executives will report to Bristol CEO Lamberto Andreotti.

“A focus on developing talent at all levels is a key element of our Bristol-Myers Squibb culture,” Andreotti said. “I am excited to expand the roles of Giovanni, Charlie and Béatrice, and look forward to working with these three senior leaders and the rest of my management team to continue to successfully execute our BioPharma strategy.”


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FRS appoints chief marketing officer

BY Michael Johnsen

FOSTER CITY, Calif. — The FRS Co. on Thursday named Matt Kohler chief marketing officer.  

"Matt has a deep understanding of consumers and the CPG industry and an impressive track record for creating and executing world class marketing," stated Carl Sweat, president and CEO of the FRS Co. "We are thrilled to have Matt on board. His experience with both billion dollar brands and high-growth startup companies will enhance the strength of our marketing and leadership teams."

In his new position, Kohler will oversee global marketing efforts including brand strategy, product innovation, advertising, promotions, social media and event marketing. Kohler will report directly to Sweat.

"This is an exciting time to join FRS. The company’s FRS Healthy Performance line of products is strongly positioned for growth," Kohler said.
 
Prior to joining FRS, Kohler served as VP marketing at Green Dot Corp., a provider of financial services. Kohler led all marketing activities for the Green Dot brand from its entrepreneurial growth stage through a successful IPO.

Previously, Kohler worked in brand management at The Clorox Company, where he was responsible for the company’s bleach brand. There, Kohler successfully launched Green Works, an innovative line of "green" plant-based cleansers, from concept to commercialization and the first new brand launch for Clorox in more than 20 years. Kohler has worked nationally and internationally for such leading brands as Coca-Cola and Johnson & Johnson. Kohler received an MBA from Harvard and a BA from American University.


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