HEALTH

Star Nutrition launches arm, calf sleeves designed to increase circulation

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICO, Calif. — Star Nutrition on Wednesday added the TEC-3 arm and calf sleeves to its Incrediwear line. Engineered from an Italian 3-D weaving machine and utilizing Carbonized Charcoal Anion Technology, the 360-thread count TEC-3 is designed to increase circulation to the arms and calves, while decreasing fatigue, swelling and recovery time.

"The TEC-3 is already loved by many championship athletes around the world," stated Star Nutrition CEO Jackson Corley. "They are using the sleeve because it helps them train harder and longer, as well as recover faster from their workouts," he said. "The TEC-3 is also our thinnest sleeve available so it allows for a premium release of negative ions and maximum benefit to the athlete."

Among the athletes currently using the TEC-3 are Morrocan runner Aissa Dghougi, MMA professional trainer Kevin Kearns, championship snowboarder Terje Haakonsen, professional rock climber Ivan Greene, four-time Olympic Judo competitor and bronze medalist Mike Swain, 2012 U.S. Judo Olympic bronze medalist Marti Malloy and eighth-degree Karate black belt Pat Haley, the company announced.

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SoloHealth to expand health-and-wellness kiosk to 4,000 locations by 2014

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA, Ga. — SoloHealth on Thursday announced it has plans in place to expand its FDA-approved SoloHealth Station health-and-wellness digital kiosks to more than 2,500 store locations by mid-2013, scaling to more than 4,000 by 2014. 

“We are fundamentally changing consumer healthcare access and along with way providing advertisers with a completely unique and effective way to reach consumers in a direct, highly personalized and engaging manner,” stated Bart Foster, SoloHealth CEO. “Our platform allows brands to become solutions for consumers — reaching health-conscious shoppers when they are engaged and interested in products that are aisles away, not miles away.”

The SoloHealth Station provides health screenings for vision, blood pressure, weight and body mass index, a symptom checker as well as an overall health assessment free of charge.  SoloHealth also helps connect consumers to local professionals through their databases, helping people enter the most appropriate and accurate point in the healthcare system.  A cloud-based platform, the SoloHealth Station is backed by technology that allows for flexibility to make changes remotely and quickly so the company can continue to expand the services offered.

The SoloHealth Station also offers highly personalized, targeted and interactive opportunities for consumers, advertisers and retailers by placing kiosks in high-traffic retail locations and offering online advertising — including interactive banners, 15- to 30-second interstitial videos, e-newsletters, email activation and digital signage. Advertisers can engage shoppers through interactive displays, video and custom solutions that can be tailored to specific advertising needs. 

According to data supplied by SoloHealth, consumers are twice as likely to engage in nontargeted media than average online consumers; four times more likely when reached through relevant content; and six times more likely to engage when targeting is based on consumers’ answers to health-related questions.

 

 

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Sanofi Pasteur seeks to expand seasonal flu protection from three influenza strains to four

BY Michael Johnsen

 SWIFTWATER, Pa. — Sanofi Pasteur on Thursday announced it has filed for approval of a four-strain flu shot to the Food and Drug Administration. An action date is anticipated in the second quarter of 2013. 

"The addition of a fourth influenza virus strain to the seasonal influenza vaccine formulation has the potential to make a substantial impact in reducing influenza disease and influenza-related complications, hospitalizations and deaths among those who contract the disease," stated David Greenberg, senior director, U.S. scientific and medical affairs, Sanofi Pasteur. "Two influenza B-lineage strains typically co-circulate in the U.S each year, so it makes sense to include both in the vaccine rather than attempting to predict which of the two will be the dominant strain. In fact, in six of the past 12 influenza seasons, the B strain selected by health authorities for inclusion in the vaccine was not the predominant B-lineage strain that circulated during the next influenza season."

The strains for each season’s influenza vaccine are selected by the FDA, in consultation with global health authorities, from the strains anticipated to circulate in the approaching influenza season. Seasonal influenza vaccines contained only two strains (one strain of type A influenza and one strain of type B influenza) until 1978, when the decision was made to incorporate a second type A influenza strain in order to provide protection against the two different A strains that were co-circulating. From then until now, influenza vaccines have been trivalent to help protect against three strains of influenza virus (two of type A and one of type B). 

However, since the influenza B Victoria lineage re-emerged worldwide in 2001-2002, two influenza B strains (one each from the Victoria and Yamagata lineages) have co-circulated with varying prevalence, making it difficult to predict the next season’s dominant B strain. Even in years when the correct B virus strain was selected for the vaccine, some influenza disease was caused by the B strain omitted from the vaccine. These factors raised the hypothesis that the addition of a second B-lineage strain to expand the licensed trivalent influenza vaccine to a quadrivalent vaccine could help reduce flu incidence.  

 

 

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