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Sparkling Ice and Kevin Durant unveil new hoops project

BY Gina Acosta

PRESTON, Wash. — Sparkling Ice is building on its partnership with NBA MVP Kevin Durant by unveiling a basketball court renovation in Sparkling Ice's hometown of Seattle at Powell Barnett Park.

The renovation is part of Kevin Durant's Charity Foundation: "BUILD IT AND THEY WILL BALL" Courts Renovation Initiative designed to increase the number of high quality basketball courts accessible to underprivileged youth across the United States and around the globe.

"Since we first started collaborating with Kevin Durant in 2014, we have looked forward to the day we would work together to unveil the renovated basketball court for our local community," said Kevin Klock, president and CEO of Talking Rain Beverage Co. "Durant started his professional career right here in Seattle, and we are proud to support his foundation in giving back to our community that has given us so much."

The court at Powell Barnett Park has undergone a full renovation thanks to a joint effort between Sparkling Ice, Seattle Parks and Recreation and the KDCF. These efforts will further extend the KDCF's reach to new communities in need of improved education, athletic and social programs. As the KDCF continues to expand its social footprint globally, Durant ensures that he connects with each community to reinforce the on-the-ground efforts personally.

"I am proud of the work we accomplished for the BUILD IT AND THEY WILL BALL program this past year," said Durant. "I have always been thankful for the role basketball played in my life as I was growing up and I understand that access to high quality courts is important for the next generation to learn, play and have fun on. I have seen the success of these courts first hand. And now with the help of Sparkling Ice, I am thrilled to bring the same opportunities to the Seattle community that is so near to my heart."

 

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Doritos teams up with Rock the Vote

BY Gina Acosta

PLANO, Texas — Doritos is aiming to show America's youth that the boldest choice they can make this year is the one at the ballot box.

This election season, Doritos, one of the marquee brands from PepsiCo's Frito-Lay division, is partnering with Rock the Vote, the largest non-partisan, nonprofit organization in the country dedicated to building long-term youth political power, to engage and mobilize young people to register to vote and participate in elections.

As part of the Boldest Choice campaign, the Doritos brand is introducing a limited-edition Doritos bag created for those not registered to vote. It has no taste, no crunch and no chips to illustrate that, if you don't make a choice, you don't get a choice. 

"This election season, Doritos believes the boldest choice is making a choice," said Jennifer Saenz, senior vice president and chief marketing officer, Frito-Lay. "We have always believed every single person can make an impact – we all have a voice and it's important we exercise that voice and be heard. Our campaign reinforces the idea that if you don't make a choice, someone else chooses for you."

To bring this message to the masses, Doritos is joining Rock the Vote on its Truth to Power bus tour to various stops at college campuses, beginning with a stop in Denver, Colo., on National Voter Registration Day. Doritos will also join Rock the Vote to rally youth voters at additional stops in Madison, Wis. and Chicago, Ill.

"It's impressive to see Doritos step up this election season as corporate partners, committed to engaging and mobilizing young people to embrace the historic power of our vote," said Jesse Moore, vice president at Rock the Vote. "Millennials represent the largest, most diverse voting bloc in our nation's history, and, given that the stakes have never been higher, it's encouraging to see companies like Doritos work with us to champion a stronger more inclusive future for young people." 

Starting tomorrow, National Voter Registration Day, consumers can order a bag of "No Choice" Doritos at Doritosredvsblue.com/Vote and send them to someone they know who is not registered to vote. 

To bring the Boldest Choice concept to life, Doritos created a vending machine that dispensed the provocative bags instead of the consumer's snack of choice to students not registered to vote. Only registered voters got their choice of Doritos Nacho Cheese or Cool Ranch from the machine — demonstrating that when you're not registered to vote, you don't get a choice and, if you are, you do. 

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OTA survey: Millennials lead other age groups in organic purchasing, trust

BY David Salazar
WASHINGTON — A new survey from the Organic Trade Association is highlighting the shopping habits of parents, in particular millennial parents. The survey also found high rates of trust for the organic label among millennial parents.  
 
The group of 18- to 34-year-olds represents about 52% of the nation’s organic buyers, according to the survey. In contrast, Generation X parents born between 1965 and 1980 made up about 35% of organic buyers and Baby Boomers represented 14% of organic buyers. 
 
“The millennial consumer and head of household is changing the landscape of our food industry,” Organic Trade Association executive director and CEO Laura Batcha. “Our survey shows that millennial parents seek out organic because they are more aware of the benefits of organic, that they place a greater value on knowing how their food was grown and produced, and that they are deeply committed to supporting a food system that sustains and nurtures the environment.”
 
The survey also found that eight-in-10 households surveyed (82%) said they buy organic sometimes, which is among the highest rate reported in the annual survey, and 49% of all households said they buy more organic foods now than a year ago. Thirty-five percent said that choosing organic products is part of their efforts to live in a way that is environmentally friendly, and more millennials said that an eco-conscious approach informed their organic buying than any other age group. Some 40% of millennials see buying organic as an integral part of green living, compared to 32% of Gen Xers and 28% of Baby Boomers
 
Millennials also see themselves as knowledgeable about organic food, with 77% saying they’re well-informed or “know quite a bit,” and that knowledge comes with faith in the organic label, with 54% of millennials saying they have confidence in the integrity of the organic label. About 60% of millennial parents said they have a “strong connection” with the label. 
 
“The millennial shopper puts a high premium on the healthiness and quality of the food they choose for their families,” Batcha said. “This generation has grown up eating organic, and seeing that organic label. It's not surprising that they have a greater knowledge of what it means to be organic, and consequently a greater trust of the organic label.”
 
According to the OTA’s 2016 industry survey, organic sales in 2015 saw new records, growing 11% from 2014  to $43.3 billion, with organic food sales making up $39.7 billion of that total, also an 11% increase. The non-food organic sales of $3.6 billion were up 13%. In 2015, almost 5% of all food sold in the United States was organic. The gravitation of consumers toward organic food is one part of what Kantar Retail calls the "FLONH effect," and the company predicts that in the next 10 years, 25% to 50% of CPG and retailer innovation will be focused on fresh, local, organic, natural or healthy products. 
 
The household survey was compiled from an online panel of more than 1,800 households with at least on child under 18 years old, and the target audience was supplemented with members of KIWI Magazine’s  Parents’ Advisory Board. 
 
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