HEALTH

Smart for Life develops gluten-free diet cookie

BY Allison Cerra

BOCA RATON, Fla. Weight-management products company Smart for Life has developed a diet cookie for those with gluten sensitivity.

The gluten-free banana chocolate chip granola square has no preservatives and is made with many organic ingredients and a balanced protein formula with healthy fats and carbohydrate ratios. As with all Smart for Life products, this gluten-free line also effectively suppresses the appetite, the company said.

"The gluten-free market is growing, but unfortunately, a lot of gluten-free products do not taste that great. We have been able to create a delicious taste profile that people will be amazed to know happens to be gluten-free," said Richard Kayne, Smart for Life COO.

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APMA recommends Health Enterprises product for runners

BY Michael Johnsen

BETHESDA, Md. The American Podiatric Medical Association recently issued a series of recommendations for runners, including the use of a self-massager designed for post-athletic activities. Specifically, the association recommended Health Enterprises’ therapeutic hot-and-cold foot massager, a product that carries the APMA seal of approval.

 

"Some of the most common running-related foot injuries that today’s podiatrists treat are arch pain, tendonitis and blisters," stated APMA president Kathleen Stone. “However, if runners can take just a few minutes to stretch properly pre-workout, select appropriate footwear and see a podiatrist immediately when foot pain occurs, many of these ailments can be avoided entirely.”

 

 

Other recommendations made by APMA included selecting a good running shoe, selecting good socks and stretching for five to 10 minutes prior to a run. Frequent runners should see a podiatrist on a regular basis to maximize any running program and prevent serious injury, the association added.

 

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CVS Caremark announces settlement of PSE sales suit

BY Antoinette Alexander

WOONSOCKET, R.I. Under a settlement reached with the Drug Enforcement Administration and the U.S. Attorneys’ Offices for the Central District of California and the District of Nevada, CVS Caremark has agreed to pay $75 million in civil penalties and $2.6 million in profit forfeitures to settle allegations that in 2007 and 2008, certain CVS/pharmacy stores in California and Nevada engaged in unlawful sales of pseudoephedrine.

CVS also must maintain certain compliance measures to monitor and prevent excessive sales of the ingredient found in popular over-the-counter cold-cough medicines. In addition, the settlement acknowledged that a distribution center in California failed to monitor and report excessive PSE sales by CVS/pharmacy stores; it related only to the retail pharmacy business.

“We are announcing today that we have resolved this issue, which unfortunately resulted from a breakdown in CVS/pharmacy’s normally high management and oversight standards,” stated Tom Ryan, chairman and CEO of CVS Caremark. “While this lapse occurred in 2007 and 2008, and has been addressed, it was an unacceptable breach of the company’s policies and was totally inconsistent with our values. CVS/pharmacy is unwavering in its support of the measures taken by the federal government and the states to prevent drug abuse. To make certain this kind of lapse never takes place again,” Ryan continued, “we have strengthened our internal controls and compliance measures, and made substantial investments to improve our handling and monitoring of PSE by implementing enhanced technology and making other improvements in our stores and distribution centers.”

The settlement does not impact any other business conducted by CVS or any of its affiliated companies. In addition, the settlement amount has been fully reserved, as previously disclosed, and should have no further effect on the company’s financial results, the company stated.

The settlement related to excessive sales of PSE at certain CVS/pharmacy locations that resulted from the flawed implementation of an electronic monitoring system to record individual PSE sales. As implemented in California, Nevada and certain other states, the system did not prevent multiple sales of PSE that totaled more than the federal daily legal limit, which made certain CVS/pharmacy stores vulnerable to criminals who intended to purchase large amounts of PSE. The excessive sales occurred primarily in California and Nevada. The settlement includes not only federal jurisdictions in California and Nevada, but also federal jurisdictions in 23 other states where the system was not implemented properly, CVS stated.

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