HEALTH

SIDI Working Group releases CoA guideline for dietary supplement makers

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON The Joint Standardized Information on Dietary Supplement Ingredients Working Group — a coalition of the dietary supplement industry’s trade associations — on Thursday announced the release of the new Certificate of Analysis guideline, the latest in a series of voluntary guidelines for the supplement industry, developed to assist finished product manufacturers with the complex process of qualifying their ingredient suppliers.

The voluntary CoA guideline outlines the type and scope of information that should appear on a CoA provided by an ingredient supplier to its finished product manufacturer for a component or ingredient used in a dietary supplement.

“A requirement of the supplier qualification process involves verifying the information provided in an ingredient CoA, and manufacturers of dietary supplements rely on supplier CoAs to ensure finished products are GMP-compliant,” stated Andrew Shao, a spokesperson for the SIDI Working Group and SVP scientific & regulatory affairs at the Council for Responsible Nutrition. “It’s essential for ingredient suppliers to have a form that can be consistently used, containing the appropriate information in a clear and concise format. … By standardizing the information on CoAs, this voluntary guideline will benefit both ingredient suppliers and dietary supplement manufacturers.”

The voluntary CoA guideline, along with sample CoA templates for botanical and non-botanical ingredients, is available on the five trade associations’ websites, along with the original SIDI protocol materials.

The SIDI Working Group is a cooperative effort run by the dietary supplement industry trade associations including the American Herbal Products Association, the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, CRN, the Natural Products Association and the United Natural Products Alliance.

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Hisamitsu America kicks off media campaign for Salonpas brand

BY Michael Johnsen

TORRANCE, Calif. Hisamitsu America on Thursday kicked off its “Join the Pain Free Movement” initiative, a media campaign to promote its line of Salonpas external pain-relief patches.

“The ‘Join the Pain Free Movement’ will entail public relations activities and a comprehensive advertising campaign that will include television, the Internet and print including [periodicals] People, Oprah and Prevention,” stated Joji Nakayama, Hisamitsu America president. “Hisamitsu will also deploy an extensive social media program that will include Facebook, Twitter and a www.jointhepainfreemovement.com Web site.”

Hisamitsu plans to distribute more than 2 million sample patches throughout the campaign.

“Although analgesic patches are well accepted in Japan and the rest of Asia, this is a new concept for the U.S. consumer,” said  Nakayama. “We strongly believe that our products have a huge advantage because we’re the only FDA approved over-the-counter patches.” The Hisamitsu executive stated that his company has done extensive clinical trials and the data is available to complement the products’ marketing program.

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TuAnalyze puts diabetes on the map

BY Allison Cerra

BERKELEY, Calif. A nonprofit organization’s Web site — which connects people touched by diabetes and raises diabetes awareness — and a children’s hospital have developed an app that measures and shares blood glucose levels.

Diabetes Hands Foundation’s TuDiabetes.org and Children’s Hospital Boston have launched TuAnalyze, which supports sharing of diabetes information throughout the community and feedback of community-level diabetes information to users.

How it works: the information submitted by members will be displayed in a map of the United States on the TuDiabetes network, with states lighting up according to the aggregate A1c data. Once a threshold of participants in each state is reached, the state’s color reflects whether the average A1c submitted is within the range recommended by physicians. Users can compare personal measures of diabetes to community measures on the TuAnalyze map.

“Many people are turning to the Internet for information, support, and resources to help manage their disease on a day by day basis,” said principal TuAnalyze investigator Kenneth Mandl, who also serves as a faculty member of the informatics program at Children’s Hospital Boston. “With TuAnalyze we aim to collect and share basic information people provide in a secure, structured way that will be beneficial to the community — so each member can learn more about themselves and their peers — and in a way that may inform public health endeavors and research.”

TuAnalyze was developed with support from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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