News

Shoppers Drug Mart names new president

BY David Salazar

Canadian retail pharmacy banner Shoppers Drug Mart will soon be under new leadership. The Brampton, Ontario-based company named Jeff Leger Shoppers Drug Mart president, effective Jan. 1, 2018. Leger’s promotion comes alongside the promotion of Mike Motz, who will move from his role as Shoppers Drug Mart president to COO of Loblaw, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

Leger was most recently Shoppers Drug Mart’s executive vice president of pharmacy and healthcare. He joined the company in 2008 as directory of category management for pharmaceuticals, holding positions of increasing responsibility. Before his most recent position, he served as senior vice president of loblaw pharmacy and pharmaceutical partnerships. He also has held positions at Apotex, Foxglove Management and Beauséjour Regional Health Authority in New Brunswick.

Motz has been with Shoppers Drug Mart since 2003 when he joined the company as vice president of operations. His operations roles increased until 2015 when he was named president of Shoppers Drug Mart.
 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

SlimFast Bake Shop options makes weight loss easier

BY Michael Johnsen

Famous for its easy-to-follow diet plan, SlimFast last week introduced its the SlimFast Bake Shop featuring new meal replacement cookies and bars.

“The new Bake Shop line is a great addition to our range of products. It gives dieters another meal replacement option, so they don’t feel deprived during their weight loss journey,” stated Chris Tisi, CEO SlimFast, which operates out of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. “SlimFast drinkers have told us how much they love our shakes and smoothies, but miss the crunch and taste of food. Now people can indulge in the sweets they love while losing weight with new Bake Shop Cookies and Bars.”

The line includes soft, chewy cookies and chocolate bars, giving dieters a new meal replacement option to switch up their diet routine. With 10 grams of protein per cookie and 15 grams of protein per bar, these baked treats will satisfy a dieter's sweet tooth while satisfying their hunger for up to four hours.

With only 1g of sugar per offering, the four flavors include peanut butter chocolate chip cookie, double chocolate chip cookie, chocolatey crispy cookie dough bar and chocolatey peanut butter pie bar.
 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Sexual Harassment 101

BY Carol Wood
How to handle sexual harassment claims can be overwhelming and terrifying for every business — from small local drug stores to large corporations serving the market. But it shouldn’t be. Regrettably, at some point, some who run these stores may become aware of sexual harassment. Here are a few tips that will help you address sexual harassment quickly and successfully.
 
First off, what constitutes sexual harassment? 
 
Sexual harassment means, simply, unwanted sexual advances in the workplace. One type of sexual harassment is “quid pro quo,” meaning “this for that.” This is what people most think of when they think of sexual harassment. These would be situations where sexual favors are expected for employment actions. “If you don’t sleep with me, I’ll fire you” would be a textbook example of quid pro quo sexual harassment. The other type of sexual harassment is creating a “hostile work environment.” A hostile work environment is where employees around you create an environment with unwanted sexual content. For example, if an employee posts pictures of women in bathing suits, it may create a “hostile work environment” for female employees in the office.
 
Sexual harassment is likely to happen. As we are now reading in the news, sexual harassment affects every industry — from the media to politics to business. Typical HR departments do receive many complaints. A conservative rule of thumb is to estimate on average one sexual harassment complaint a year for every 50 employees. If you have 10 employees, within five years it is likely you will receive a complaint.
 
Documenting a complaint 
protects you
The No. 1 mistake that managers make with sexual harassment is avoiding it. I have seen many managers receive a complaint, quickly determine the complaint does not justify more action and then dismiss the issue without documenting the complaint or the rationale for dismissing the issue. Say an employee is complaining that she does not want to be scheduled with another employee. He’s always asking her out for a date, and it is making her uncomfortable — what should you do?
 
While it might seem minor, it should be treated as a complaint of sexual harassment and be documented and investigated. Documenting a complaint doesn’t mean it is definitely harassment.  It simply enables the manager to track the facts: whether or not harassment occurred or if there is even sufficient evidence to conclude it is harassment. Remember, it is the manager’s obligation not only to protect the business but also the people involved. So, you are better off documenting even the most minor incidents rather than brushing them off.
 
Resolve potential harassment issues before making any accommodations
Well-meaning managers sometimes alter the employee shifts or schedules in an attempt to resolve a harassment complaint, but that could be seen as retaliatory action against an employee who has made a complaint.  
 
Here is an example of steps retailers might take to resolve the issue:  
  • Conducting a prompt and thorough investigation into the complaint that maintains the confidentiality of those involved as much as you can. The investigation does not need to be more than talking one-on-one to the parties involved and to any apparent witnesses to determine facts.
  • 
Disciplining the harasser and/or requiring the person to participate in training, depending on what you find.
  • 
Reminding the person being investigated that he or she must not retaliate in any way against the complainant.
  • 
Documenting the investigation and the action taken.
  • Make sure you document each of these steps. Often any one of these steps puts an end to the issue and improves the working environment for your employees. If the harassment continues, more serious action may be required.
  • Should you receive or become aware of a potential harassment complaint, address it head on. 
By adhering to a strict rule of documenting the facts of even complaints that are determined to be invalid, you can protect your employees and your business.
 
Carol Wood is the people operations director overseeing HR at Home-
base (www.joinhomebase.com) in 
San Francisco.
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?