HEALTH

Schwabe positions homeopathic cough-cold remedy Zucol for children’s fall cold-flu season

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK Schwabe, through it’s U.S. subsidiary Nature’s Way, is looking to position its homeopathic cough-cold remedy Zucol as this season’s remedy du jour in light of many of the safety and efficacy concerns raised about allopathic pediatric cough-cold medicines.

“Zucol is powerful medicine to fight colds, and this plant-based extract has been studied extensively and found to be safe for children,” stated David Riley, clinical associate professor at the University of New Mexico Medical School and founder of the Integrative Medicine Institute. “In Germany, it is prescribed to adults of all ages and children beginning at two years of age—though we recommend that when used for children younger than six, you consult your family doctor. … “With all of the recent warnings from the FDA about conventional cough and cold medications in children, it seems prudent to use a safe and effective alternative.”

Zucol contains an extract of pelargonium sidoides, which has been the subject of 18 published clinical studies involving more than 2,500 patients, according to the company. These studies concluded that cold sufferers were able to return to their normal routines two days faster than those who simply treated their symptoms with OTC medications.  

Zinc gluconate has also been found to reduce the duration of cough-cold symptoms. However, Nature’s Way maintains as a point of differentiation that Zucol does not irritate membranes, upset the stomach or leave a lingering unpleasant taste in the mouth.

“For hundreds of years African Zulu tribes have used pelargonium sidoides preparations to treat coughs and upper respiratory symptoms, and it is the top-selling active ingredient for upper respiratory tract infections sold in Germany and most of Europe,” David Gumner, vice president of Mass Market for Nature’s Way said. “Extensive clinical research has proven the safety and efficacy of pelargonium, which justifies its use to reduce the need for typical OTC medications that merely mask symptoms of the common cold.”  

In a press release issued Tuesday, Nature’s Way noted the cough-cold remedy would be distributed through Walgreens in January and is currently available in all Rite Aid, Duane Reade, Meijer Stores and regional drug stores and pharmacies across the U.S.

The benefits of pelargonium have been featured in several U.S. medical journals including the American Family Physician and The Journal of Family Practice, the company stated.

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Tylenol Warming Liquids hit shelves in time for cough-cold season

BY Michael Johnsen

FORT WASHINGTON, Pa. McNeil Consumer Healthcare recently launched three new cough/cold SKUS—under the brand name Tylenol Warming Liquids—that will both help to relieve cold symptoms, and as a point of differentiation, couple that relief with a “gentle warming sensation.”

It’s not the first time the venerable over-the-counter manufacturer has infused a sensory component into its product offerings. The company began branding its line of cough/cold/allergy and analgesic non-liquid medicines with a cool mint flavor dubbed Cool Burst in 2004.

While the line extension strategy does little to improve the efficacy of the medicine—it’s neither intended to, nor is it marketed so—McNeil consumer research has found that customers treating their headaches or sniffles nevertheless feel better about taking a flavorful pill, and now a sensory liquid.

McNeil first test-marketed the strategy with the launch of Tylenol Sinus Severe Congestion with Cool Burst in September 2003. McNeil followed that launch into the pain relief section with Adult Extra Strength Tylenol Cool Caplets in April, 2004.

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Exergen files suit against Kidz-Med, alleges patent infringement

BY Michael Johnsen

WATERTOWN, Mass. Exergen recently filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts against Kidz-Med, the suppliers of the Thermofocus thermometer, alleging that the defendants have infringed five U.S. patents governing non-invasive temperature sensors owned by Exergen.

“I began working on heat-sensing technology back in 1980,” said Francesco Pompei, president of Exergen. “Since then [we] have developed non-invasive temperature sensors that are used in a multitude of applications, from home and professional medical thermometers to heat sensors used by NASA.”

According to the company, Exergen’s patented award-winning TemporalScanner temporal artery thermometers are used in more than 30 percent of hospitals and more than one million homes, with retail models being sold in Wal-Mart, Walgreens, Costco, Sam’s Club, Babies ‘R’ US and Toys ‘R’ Us.

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