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Sanofi US survey reveals differences in opinion about diabetes

BY Michael Johnsen

BRIDGEWATER, N.J. — Sanofi US announced Wednesday the findings of a new survey that reveals striking differences in opinion among various age groups about diabetes and available treatment options. In particular, the generation known as "millennials" (those ages 18 years to 34 years) shows an uneasy mix of fear and ability to handle managing their diabetes, which is being diagnosed at a rate of 1.7 million new cases every year.
 
Millennials rate themselves having better knowledge of diabetes than do Americans ages 35 years and older, with 72% of millennials indicating they are well-versed about the condition versus the 64% of non-millennials who expressed some knowledge about diabetes. Despite this self-reported understanding, millennials are less likely than older populations to think that diabetes is a serious health condition; overall, 74% of millennials think it is serious compared with 84% of the older survey respondents.
 
An estimated 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, are living with diabetes, including an estimated 8.1 million who remain undiagnosed. If current trends continue, 1-in-3 Americans could eventually be diagnosed with diabetes. With diabetes an increasingly common health concern, it is more important than ever that those living with the condition have an understanding of disease management and treatment options. 
 
Millennials' attitudes towards managing diabetes prove unique. More than two-fifths of millennials (43%) report they are scared of pricking their finger to monitor blood sugar levels, compared with 28% of older respondents. And more millennials living with diabetes confess that they think having to take insulin is the end of the road; half (54%) think this, compared with one-third (36%) of older respondents.
 
"With high levels of education and unprecedented access to information, millennials have the means to know more about diabetes than any generation in history," said Elissa Violino, registered dietician and certified diabetes educator with CDE Help Team, Sanofi US. "Diabetes is becoming more common, so it is necessary that we provide all people, including millennials, with the information and tools they need to help reduce the risk of or help manage their diabetes, as well as understand treatment options."
 
Medical advances have led to numerous treatment options that can help manage blood sugar levels, an essential task for people living with diabetes, and insulin continues to be among the key medications prescribed by healthcare providers to people whose bodies either do not produce insulin (Type 1 diabetes) or do not use insulin properly (Type 2 diabetes). As the prevalence of diabetes increases, an understanding of insulin therapy (in conjunction with a diabetes treatment plan, which may include diet, exercise and other diabetes medications) is essential. The survey findings show that many young people and others living with diabetes believe insulin is the end of the road is concerning, and it reinforces the need to educate people that insulin may be an important component, Sanofi US noted. 
 
Market Probe International fielded the survey online on behalf of Sanofi US in August 2014. The survey achieved a random and representative sample of 1,002 respondents from the continental United States plus Hawaii.
 
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Ethnic beauty brand Ampro Industries launches ‘A Positive Message’ campaign

BY Antoinette Alexander

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — This year, Ampro Industries, a maker of multicultural hair care and beauty products, is increasing awareness of its philanthropic activities through a new campaign called, "A Positive Message."

In the past, Ampro has worked with such organizations as the Parkinson's Disease Foundation and the Mid-South Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure to help bring awareness to their organizations and share their purposes with Ampro consumers. Through its new "A Positive Message" campaign, Ampro will work with International HIV/AIDS Activist Hydeia Broadbent to show Ampro consumers the positive life one can live with HIV/AIDS, how one can protect him/herself from contracting the virus and what they can do to help find a cure.

Born HIV positive, Broadbent has devoted her life to setting a positive example. Since age 6, Broadbent has spoken publicly about her status and by age 12, appeared on many national television programs including “Oprah,” “20/20,” “Good Morning America” and "A Conversation with Magic Johnson" on Nickelodeon.

At birth, Broadbent was abandoned at the University Medical Center of Southern Nevada in Las Vegas where Patricia and Loren Broadbent adopted her as an infant. Although her HIV condition was congenital, she was not diagnosed as HIV-positive with advancement to AIDS until age 3. Now at the age of 30, Hydeia spends her time spreading the message of HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention.

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McNeil Consumer partners with pediatrician Tanya Altmann with tips on keeping children healthy during cold-and-flu season

BY Michael Johnsen

FORT WASHINGTON, Pa. — According to a recent survey conducted by Mom Central in partnership with the makers of Tylenol, 52% of moms agree that a baby’s first fever is the most challenging motherhood moment, and 82% report they are most likely to consult their pediatrician to navigate such milestones. 
 
The survey also revealed moms continue to worry about the risks of flu season even as their children age, with 46% of moms with older children reporting the flu as the illness they feel least-equipped to manage.
 
To help moms manage this year's cold and flu season, McNeil Consumer is partnering with pediatrician Tanya Altmann on the Smiling it Forward program to share tips on how moms can help keep children healthy during cold and flu season.
 
“As a mom, I know how natural it is to panic when your baby is sick or has a fever. Despite being a pediatrician myself, my baby’s first fever was one of my scariest motherhood moments,” Altmann said. “It’s important for moms to remember to stay calm if their child isn’t feeling well or has a fever, as there are steps you can take to get your child healthy and achieve that ’feel better’ smile in no time.”
 
To help keep your child healthy and comfortable during cold-and-flu season, Altmann recommends the following:
 
  • Protect the family from harmful germs. Be sure to wash your child’s hands, and your own, often when entering the house, before eating and after using the bathroom. Make this a year-round and daily habit, not only during flu and cold season. If you’re on the go, hand sanitizer and wipes are a quick alternative;
  • Ease congestion. If your child has a stuffy nose, use a drop or two of nasal saline in each nostril. If the stuffiness keeps your little one from sleeping or eating, try gentle suctioning, which will help remove mucus from their nose. You can also run a cool-mist humidifier or vaporizer in your child’s bedroom at night to help alleviate congestion. Remember to clean the humidifier often;
  • Know when to consult your pediatrician. If your baby is under three months and has a temperature of 100.4 or higher, always call your pediatrician before treating. For older children, pay attention to your child’s activity level as it can give you a good idea of whether he or she needs to see a doctor;
  • Don’t panic. If your child develops a fever, stay calm – it can often be relieved at home with a fever reducer, like Children’s or Infants’ Tylenol. Always make sure to use the dosing device that came with the product and talk to your doctor for dosing children under 2 years of age. Remember to always use the product as directed;
  • Help boost the family’s immune system. A well-balanced diet is one of the best ways to keep your family as healthy as possible. Foods like fresh fruits and vegetables, milk, and lots of water should be part of your child’s daily menu in order to help keep their immune system strong and healthy;
  • Adopt a good sleep routine. Make sure your child gets plenty of rest. School-age children should get at least 10 hours of sleep per day. For toddlers, it’s important to keep those busy hands and feet at rest for at least 12 hours; and
  • Vaccinate. The Centers for Disease Control recommends flu vaccinations for everyone over 6 months of 3 years of age. If your baby is younger than six months, you can protect your child by vaccinating everyone else around them, including parents, grandparents, siblings and other caregivers. Talk to your child’s doctor to see if vaccination is appropriate.
 
For more children’s health tips and informational videos from Altmann, visit SmilingItForward.com. While there, Tylenol is encouraging moms to also share photos of their children’s “feel better” smiles. Each approved smile shared will trigger a $1 donation to Children’s Health Fund, up to $100,000, to help ensure a doctor’s visit is always within reach for children in need.
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