News

Safeway Foundation gives $2 million to community health programs, hospitals

BY Michael Johnsen

PLEASANTON, Calif. — The Safeway Foundation on Monday announced it is giving $2 million to community health programs and hospitals to launch grassroots projects for the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity.

The "Innovative Approaches to Preventing Childhood Obesity" grants are a part of an overall outreach and commitment to community health.

"Our commitment is to strengthen communities, create pioneering programs, expand services and implement new strategies to support the health of children and teens," stated Larree Renda, Safeway EVP and chairwoman of the Safeway Foundation. "These funds will allow doctors, researchers and others in the medical and healthcare communities to launch effective new programs and evaluate the effectiveness of existing ones with the goal of helping children live happier, healthier lives."

The Safeway Foundation’s partner in this effort is Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland in northern California. In early 2012, the partners invited organizations to apply for grants of up to $100,000 for grassroots childhood obesity projects in the geographic areas served by Safeway, Vons, Pavilions, Tom Thumb, Randalls, Carrs and Dominick’s stores. Specifically, they looked to promote collaborations between the medical community and local community-based agencies to help children become more physically active, improve food choices and create better access to healthy foods. More than 150 organizations applied for funding.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

Happy Family introduces Happy Squeeze

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK — Organic food brand Happy Family has introduced a new line of low-calorie, on-the-go snacks and treats.

The company said its Happy Squeeze brand offers 10 new portable pouches for both kids and adults under four lines: Happy Squeeze Super, Happy Squeeze Coco, Happy Squeeze Fruit and Veggie Twist and Happy Squeeze Treat.

  • Happy Squeeze Super combines such superfruits as acai, pomegranate and kiwi with the super grain salba. It is available in pomegranate, blueberry and apple; acai, grape and apple; and kiwi, banana and apple varieties;

  • Happy Squeeze Coco is real fruit mixed with coconut milk to create a snack or dessert. The two Coco varieties, strawberry and orange mango, each contain two-thirds of a cup of fruit;

  • Happy Squeeze Fruit and Veggie Twist combines organic fruits, vegetables and salba, and is packed with antioxidants and vitamin C and containing a half cup of fruit. It is available in blueberry, apple and purple carrot; apple, mango and kale; and strawberry, kiwi and beet flavors; and

  • Happy Squeeze Treat is a guilt-free indulgence and transforms such favorite dessert flavors as caramel apple and chocolate pear.

Each pouch is less than 100 calories, are free of gluten, preservatives, artificial colors and flavors, trans fats and GMOs. Happy Squeeze also is certified organic by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The new Happy Squeeze snacks and treats are sold in BPA-free packaging for a suggested retail price of $1.69. The line now is available at retailers nationwide.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

Kroger’s new private label seeks to provide customers with ‘simple’ food

BY Allison Cerra

CINCINNATI — Kroger has introduced a new private-label brand that’s designed to take the guesswork out of food selection by providing shoppers with access to nearly 250 "honest, easy and affordable items for simply better living."

Kroger said that its Simple Truth products are free from 101 artificial preservatives and ingredients that some customers have said they do not want in their foods, while the Simple Truth Organic line is certified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Together, the brands span more than 30 product categories, including a wide variety of foods, such as milk, salads, dried fruit, sodas, yogurt, chips and quinoa. Kroger noted that all Simple Truth and Simple Truth Organic products are clearly marked with the brand’s green circular logo and contain straightforward ingredient statements. Simple Truth Organic items display the USDA organic seal on the front of packaging, while Simple Truth products have highly visible identifiers that indicate their category.

Simple Truth and Simple Truth Organic brands will be rolled out in phases beginning this month with new food introductions, including cereals, frozen pizza and vegetarian options. By January 2013, both brands will collectively expand to more than 40 product categories and appear in many aisles at Kroger’s family of stores. Simple Truth and Simple Truth Organic brands are being introduced to customers nationwide through an integrated marketing campaign, involving both in-store and online components.

"While organic products are available in most conventional grocery stores, our customers told us that labels can be confusing, and there’s a general belief in the marketplace that organic means more expensive," Kroger VP natural foods Mary Ellen Adcock said. "At Kroger we understand these challenges, so we’re offering our shoppers the Simple Truth Organic brand, an easy, more clearly labeled and affordable way to buy organic products."

Additional information about Simple Truth offerings can be found on the brand’s website.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?