PHARMACY

Rite Aid working quickly to reopen stores following hurricane

BY Michael Johnsen

CAMP HILL, Pa. In the wake of evacuations forced by Hurricane Gustav through Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, Rite Aid on Tuesday reopened 32 of 50 stores temporarily closed and is in the process of opening the other locations impacted by the evacuations as quickly as possible and made a $75,000 donation to the American Red Cross to support that relief agency’s mobilization of some 4,000 disaster relief workers to the region and the some 500 shelters the Red Cross opened to help shelter evacuees.

“Our hearts go out to the victims, families and communities affected by Hurricane Gustav,” stated Mary Sammons, Rite Aid chairman, president and chief executive officer. “I am also very appreciative of all our pharmacists and other associates that have worked so hard to keep our stores open and will be reopening stores as soon as that can be done safely,” she said. “We are hoping that our donation to The American Red Cross can help make it just a little easier for those who have been impacted the most.”

Of those reopenings, four stores in Mississippi are still operating without a pharmacy as of late Tuesday evening, Rite Aid reported.

In anticipation of the storm, Rite Aid had positioned truck loads with extra supplies just outside affected areas, including extra generators and the diesel fuel to run them so that stores operating in areas without power can get back online. Rite Aid also has on hand hundreds of Rite Aid associates from other regions, including pharmacists, who are on standby to assist with the expected demand.

Assessments will be made for mobile units and additional storefronts that may be used when the full effect of the storm is known, the company stated.

The company is also preparing for similar evacuations this weekend along the Southeastern United States should Tropical Storm Hanna, currently off the coast of Cuba, regain hurricane strength. The storm is presently projected to make landfall along the South Carolina coast Saturday morning, though that projection is still fairly uncertain.

Hanna will be closely followed by Tropical Storm Ike, which is expected to reach hurricane strength by Wednesday evening. Ike is expected to be in the area of the Bahamas by Sunday evening.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Rx Response mobilizes to respond to Hurricane Gustav

BY Alaric DeArment

WASHINGTON With Hurricane Gustav barely missing New Orleans, several retail pharmacy, pharmaceutical and medical industry organizations have mobilized to respond.

Rx Response’s purpose is to provide a single point of contact between emergency management officials and the pharmaceutical supply system. It uses a network that allows the officials to communicate with it concerning issues that might affect the supply system, such as pharmaceutical needs. For example, public health officials in Louisiana and Alabama have asked it for a list of pharmacies that closed when Gustav made landfall so that they could direct patients to operating pharmacies.

The organization began almost two years ago in response to Hurricane Katrina and the threat of pandemic influenza. Its members include the American Hospital Association, the American Red Cross, the Biotechnology Industry Organization, the Generic Pharmaceutical Association, the Healthcare Distribution Management Association, the National Association of Chain Drug Stores, the National Community Pharmacists Association and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Old anti-itching drug may become new hepatitis treatment

BY Alaric DeArment

STANFORD, Calif. Researchers at Stanford University have found a possible new way to combat hepatitis C, according to a report published online in the Aug. 31 issue of Nature Biotechnology.

The researchers found that clemizole hydrochloride, an anti-itching drug, hindered a protein in the hepatitis C virus called NS4B, which is crucial to the virus’ replication without harming cells similar to those found in the liver, which the virus targets.

“We’re excited about this, and we’re actively moving forward toward clinical trials,” said Dr. Jeffrey Glenn, an associate professor of gastroenterology and hepatology at Stanford.

Glenn said that if it proves effective in human trials, clemizole could become an essential component in a new class of multi-drug treatments for hepatitis C.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?