PHARMACY

Richard Salazar joins Pharmacy First’s Rx$hare program

BY Allison Cerra

OVERLAND PARK, Kan. A national network of retail community pharmacies has named a new manufacturer contracting director for a retail program designed to generate significant, incremental revenue for such businesses.

Pharmacy First announced Monday that Richard Salazar would join its Rx$hare program. Salazar will be responsible for all manufacturer contracts and programs under the Rx$hare program banner, which include market share programs, awareness programs, launch programs and Compliance Services, a direct-mail, patient-focused adherence model.

Prior to joining Pharmacy First, Salazar was national director of Rx and business development for AmerisourceBergen for six years.

“Clearly, with the retail pharmacy arena changing so quickly, we needed a person who knows the terrain and has contacts throughout the pharma industry. Additionally, we needed a person who understands the value of making and maintaining solid business relationships,” said Brian Huckle, Wholesale Alliance/Pharmacy First CEO. “Our board of directors is excited about getting someone like Rick to join our team, and we remain extremely excited about the opportunities available for independent pharmacies, and the solutions Pharmacy First offers to them.”

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Independent pharmacy lobby weighs in as feds mull ‘grandfather’ status for plans

BY Jim Frederick

ALEXANDRIA, Va. Federal agencies enforcing new health-reform mandates must act to preserve patients’ access to the pharmacy of their choice and lower-cost generic medicines, the independent pharmacy lobby urged the government Tuesday.

In a written appeal to three federal agencies, the National Community Pharmacists Association asserted that health plans seeking Grandfathered Health Plan status under the landmark health-reform law enacted earlier this year must maintain patient freedom of choice and ease of access to generics in a reformed healthcare network. Otherwise, urged NCPA acting EVP and CEO Doug Hoey, those plans should lose their special status.

The NCPA sent a letter Tuesday to three agencies that currently are developing criteria for maintaining GHP status following implementation of the massive Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The appeal went to the Internal Revenue Service, Employee Benefit Security Administration and Department of Health and Human Services Office of Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight.

The NCPA’s goal, in its own words: to advance “patient choice and greater utilization of generic prescription drugs” as health plans jostle for a central role in a reformed healthcare system. “Providing quality patient care is vital to healthcare reform, and health plans that want to maintain grandfathered health plan status should not be allowed to alter their structure and benefits in ways that undermine those objectives,” Hoey said.

“For example, the face-to-face interaction patients get in their local pharmacies has a proven, positive track record in terms of health outcomes. Changes by health plans that steer patients against their will toward mail-order pharmacies represent more than just ‘reasonable routine changes’ to an existing health plan and should cause them to lose grandfathered health plan status,” Hoey asserted in his letter today. “Similarly, health plans should not be able to maintain grandfathered status when they change their prescription drug formulary designs by creating or expanding a list of ‘specialty medications’ in order to shift patients to a specific mail-order pharmacy.”

Such changes, Hoey added, would limit access to those drugs by plan beneficiaries, since many specialty drugs aren’t available to independent drug stores. “These are more than ‘reasonable routine changes’ and should also cause them to lose their grandfathered status,” he told the federal agencies.

“On the other hand,” Hoey added, “when generic alternatives become available, the brand-name prescription drug is routinely placed in a higher co-pay tier in the drug formulary to promote the use of the generic. That is indeed a ‘reasonable routine change’ and should not be grounds for a plan losing its grandfathered status.”

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Vaccines sector of healthcare market expands, report finds

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK The global market for vaccines grew to more than $20 billion last year, according to a report by healthcare market research firm Kalorama Information.

 

The New York-based firm’s report, “Vaccines 2010: World Market Analysis, Key Players and Critical Trends in a Fast-Changing Industry,” indicated that the world market for preventative vaccines was $22.1 billion in 2009, compared with $19 billion in 2008.

 

 

“We’ve forecasted a high growth rate for vaccines over the past few years, and market events have matched our predictions,” Kalorama publisher Bruce Carlson said. “The vaccine business is not without its risks, but for some companies, vaccines were the only bright spot in their portfolio in 2009. It’s not a surprise therefore that development is heavy in this sector, and that will continue to contribute to growth over the next five years.”

 

 

Much of the market centers on five companies, namely Merck, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Novartis and Sanofi-Aventis division Sanofi Pasteur. GlaxoSmithKline took a quarter of the market, thanks largely to the influenza vaccines Fluvarix and Hiberix, Kalorama said.

 

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