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Reports: ShopRite to open second ShopRite-branded gas station

BY Antoinette Alexander

ALBANY, N.Y. — Grocery chain ShopRite is opening a ShopRite-branded gas station/convenience store in Albany, N.Y., in September, according to published reports.

The station currently is a Mobil and is located near a ShopRite grocery store on the same block that opened in April, and marks ShopRite’s second branded gas station, according to reports. The first station is located in Middletown, N.Y. The new 16-pump station will offer discounts to holders of the grocer’s Price Plus Club card.

According to reports, ShopRite had discussed plans to start selling gas in the area, but the first site was expected to be located several miles away.

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Vitamin D deficiency associated with poor lung function in child asthmatics

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — Vitamin D deficiency is associated with poor lung function in asthmatic children treated with inhaled corticosteroids, according to a new study from researchers in Boston released Friday.

“In our study of 1,024 children with mild to moderate persistent asthma, those who were deficient in vitamin D levels showed less improvement in pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) after one year of treatment with inhaled corticosteroids than children with sufficient levels of vitamin D,” stated Ann Chen Wu, assistant professor in the Department of Population Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute. “These results indicate that vitamin D supplementation may enhance the anti-inflammatory properties of corticosteroids in patients with asthma.”

The findings were published online ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

The study was conducted using data from the Childhood Asthma Management Program, a multi-center trial of asthmatic children between the ages of 5 years and 12 years who were randomly assigned to treatment with budesonide (inhaled corticosteroid), nedocromil, or placebo. Vitamin D levels were categorized as deficient (≤ 20 ng/ml), insufficient (20-30 ng/ml), or sufficient (> 30 ng/ml).

Among children treated with inhaled corticosteroids, pre-bronchodilator FEV1 increased during 12 months of treatment by 330 ml in the vitamin D insufficiency group and 290 ml in the vitamin D sufficiency group, but only 140 ml in the vitamin D deficient group.

Compared with children who were vitamin D sufficient or insufficient, children who were vitamin D deficient were more likely to be older, be African-American and have higher body mass index. Compared with being vitamin D deficient, being vitamin D sufficient or insufficient was associated with a greater change in pre-bronchodilator FEV1 over 12 months of treatment after adjustment for age, gender, race, BMI, history of emergency department visits, and season that the vitamin D specimen was drawn.

The study had some limitations, including a small sample size of 101 vitamin D deficient children, and the investigators only studied vitamin D levels at one time point, the authors suggested.

“Our study is the first to suggest that vitamin D sufficiency in asthmatic children treated with inhaled corticosteroids is associated with improved lung function,” Wu said. “Accordingly, vitamin D levels should be monitored in patients with persistent asthma being treated with inhaled corticosteroids. If vitamin D levels are low, supplementation with vitamin D should be considered.”


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Vitalah launches effervescent nutritional supplement

BY Michael Johnsen

SANTA CRUZ, Calif. — Vitalah on Wednesday launched a seven-count box of Oxylent — now formulated without sugar and touting zero calories — that is available in three flavors: sparkling berries, sparkling blackberry pomegranate and sparkling mandarin.
 
“No more bottles, no more pills, no more spilling supplements in your purse or travel bag. Our 7-count box is made for today’s active consumer who wants real nutrition without the sugar and calories,” Vitalah CEO Lisa Lent said. “Add the powder to your water bottle, and experience the sparkling beverage that picks up your energy naturally.”
 
The Oxylent effervescent contains a blend of enzymes, vitamins, minerals, electrolytes and amino acids. The effervescent delivery system ensures better absorption.

According to Lent, Oxylent represents a new generation of supplements with features that consumers want — no calories, naturally sweetened, no binders or anticaking agents, and no artificial ingredients or caffeine. In addition, the product is gluten- and dairy-free.


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